Etymology
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misuse (v.)

late 14c., misusen, "use or treat improperly;" from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + use (v.) and in part from Old French mesuser (Modern French méuser), from mis- (2). Meaning "abuse, treat badly, subject to ill-treatment" is attested from 1530s. Related: Misused; misusing; misusage.

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misuse (n.)

late 14c., "improper use, misapplication," from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + use (n.) and in part from Old French mesus "abuse, excess, misdeed." As "abuse, ill-treatment" it is attested from 1590s.

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misemployment (n.)

"misapplication, misuse," 1590s, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + employment.

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catachresis (n.)

"an improper or inconsistent metaphor, exceptional or undue extension of a word's meaning" (as "to stone someone with bricks"), 1580s, from Latin catachresis, from Greek katakhresis "misuse" (of a word), from katakhresthai "to misuse," from kata "down" (here with a sense of "perversion;" see cata-) + khresthai "to use" (from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want"). Related: Catachrestic; catachrestical; catachrestically.

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abuse (v.)
Origin and meaning of abuse
early 15c., "to misuse, misapply" (power, money, etc.), from Old French abuser "deceive, abuse, misuse" (14c.), from Vulgar Latin *abusare, from Latin abusus "an abusing; a using up," past participle of abuti "use up, consume," also "misuse, abuse, misapply, outrage," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + uti "use" (see use).

Also in reference to forbidden sexual situations from early 15c., but originally meaning incest, masturbation (self-abuse), homosexuality, prostitution, etc. From 1550s specifically as "to misuse sexually, ravish," but OED 2nd ed. marks this obsolete and the modern use "subject (someone) to unwanted sexual activity" is likely a fresh coinage from late 20c. Specifically of drugs, from 1968. Meaning "attack with harsh language, revile" is from c. 1600. Related: Abused; abusing.
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malaprop (n.)

"a ludicrous misuse of a big word," 1823, from the name of the theatrical character Mrs. Malaprop, who was noted for her blunders in the use of words (see malapropism). As an adjective, "out of place, inapt," by 1840. Related: Malapropian.

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disuse (v.)

c. 1400, disusen, "to misuse, pervert;" mid-15c., "become unaccustomed" (both senses now obsolete), from or on analogy of Old French desuser, from des- "not" (see dis-) + user "use" (see use (v.)). Meaning "cease to use, neglect to employ" is from late 15c.

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dissipation (n.)

early 15c., dissipacioun, "disintegration, dissolution," from Latin dissipationem (nominative dissipatio) "a scattering," noun of action from past-participle stem of dissipare "to spread abroad, scatter, disperse; squander, disintegrate" (see dissipate). Sense of "act of wasting by misuse, wasteful expenditure or consumption" is from 1630s; meaning "intemperate mode of living, undue indulgence in pleasure" is from 1784.

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misfeasance (n.)

"misuse of power, wrongful exercise of lawful authority or improper performance of a lawful act," 1590s, from French mesfaisance, from mesfaisant, present participle of Old French mesfaire "to misdo," from mes- "wrongly" (see mis- (2)) + faire "to do," from Latin facere "to make, do, perform" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Misfeasor.

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anon (adv.)
late Old English anon "straightway, forthwith," earlier on an, literally "into one," thus "continuously; straightway (in one course), at once;" see one. As a reply, "at once, coming!" By gradual misuse, "soon, in a little while" (1520s). A one-word etymological lesson in procrastination.
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