Etymology
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mist (n.)

"weather condition consisting of a cloud resting upon the ground, fog," also "precipitation consisting of fine droplets of water, much smaller than rain," Old English mist (earliest in compounds, such as misthleoðu "misty cliffs," wælmist "mist of death"), from Proto-Germanic *mikhstaz (source also of Middle Low German mist, Dutch mist, Icelandic mistur, Norwegian and Swedish mist), perhaps from PIE *meigh- "to urinate." Greek omikhle "fog;" Old Church Slavonic migla"fog;" Sanskrit mih- "fog, mist," megha "cloud" sometimes are said to be cognates in this secondary sense, but Beekes finds these rather more likely to be from a separate IE root meaning "fog."

Sometimes distinguished from fog, either as being less opaque or as consisting of drops large enough to have a perceptible downward motion. [OED]

Also in Old English in reference to dimness of the eyes or eyesight, either by illness or tears, and in a figurative sense of "something that darkens and obscures mental vision." Meaning "haze of dust in the air producing obscurity of things seen at a distance" is by 1785.

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mist (v.)

Old English mistian "to become misty, to be or grow misty;" see mist (n.). Meaning "cover with or as with mist" is from early 15c. Related: Misted; misting.

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misty (adj.)

Old English mistig; but the modern word is perhaps reformed in Middle English from mist (n.) + -y (2). From mid-14c. as "filled or covered with mist, overspread with mist;" early 15c. as "dim, obscure, or clouded as if by mist." Related: Mistily; mistiness.

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haze (n.)
"opaqueness of the atmosphere," 1706, probably a back-formation of hazy (q.v.). Sense of "confusion, vagueness" is 1797. The differentiation of haze, mist, fog (and other dialectal words) is unmatched in other tongues, where the same word generally covers all three and often "cloud" as well; this may be an effect of the English climate on the English language.
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*meigh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to urinate." 

It forms all or part of: micturate; micturition; missel; mist; mistletoe.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mehati "urinates;" Avestan maezaiti "urinates;" Greek omeikhein "to urinate;" Latin mingere "to urinate;" Armenian mizem "urinate;" Lithuanian minžu, minžti "urinate;" Old English migan "to urinate," micga "urine," meox "dung, filth."

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muggy (adj.)

"damp and close, warm and humid," 1746, with -y (2) + obsolete mug "a fog, mist," from Middle English mugen "to drizzle" (of a fog or a mist, late 14c.), from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse mugga "drizzling mist," which is possibly from PIE *meug- "slimy, slippery" (see mucus).

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nebulizer (n.)

"instrument for reducing a liquid to spray" (for inhalation, etc.), 1865, agent noun from verb nebulize "to reduce to a mist or spray" (1865), from Latin nebula "mist" (see nebula) + -ize. Related: Nebulization.

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atomizer (n.)
"apparatus to reduce liquids to a spray or mist," 1865, agent noun from atomize.
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Nibelungenlied (n.)
German epic poem of 13c., literally "song of the Nibelungs," a race of dwarves who lived in Norway and owned a hoard of gold and a magic ring, literally "children of the mist," from Proto-Germanic *nibulunga-, a suffixed patronymic form from *nebla- (source of Old High German nebul "mist, fog, darkness," Old English nifol), from PIE root *nebh- "cloud." With lied "song" (see Lied).
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vaporize (v.)
1630s, "to smoke" (tobacco), from vapor + -ize. Later "convert into vapor, cause to become vapor" (1803), and "spray with fine mist" (1900). Intransitive sense "become vaporous" is from 1828. Related: Vaporized; vaporizing. An earlier verb was simply vapor (c. 1400, transitive and intransitive), from Latin vaporare.
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