Etymology
Advertisement
mission (n.)

1590s, "a sending abroad" (as an agent), originally of Jesuits, from Latin missionem (nominative missio) "act of sending, a dispatching; a release, a setting at liberty; discharge from service, dismissal," noun of action from past-participle stem of mittere "to release, let go; send, throw," which de Vaan traces to a PIE *m(e)ith- "to exchange, remove," also source of Sanskrit methete, mimetha "to become hostile, quarrel," Gothic in-maidjan "to change;" he writes, "From original 'exchange', the meaning developed to 'give, bestow' ... and 'let go, send'."

Meaning "an organized effort for the spread of religion or for enlightenment of a community" is by 1640s; that of "a missionary post or station" is by 1769. The diplomatic sense of "body of persons sent to a foreign land on commercial or political business" is from 1620s; in American English, sometimes "a foreign legation or embassy, the office of a foreign envoy" (1805).

General sense of "that for which one is sent or commissioned" is from 1670s; meaning "that for which a person or thing is destined" (as in man on a mission, one's mission in life) is by 1805. Meaning "dispatch of an aircraft on a military operation" (by 1929, American English) was extended to spacecraft flights (1962), hence, mission control "team on the ground responsible for directing a spacecraft and its crew" (1964). As a style of furniture, said to be imitative of furniture in the buildings of original Spanish missions to western North America, it is attested from 1900.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
missionary (adj.)

"relating to or pertaining to a mission, sent on a mission," especially a Christian mission, 1640s, from Modern Latin missionarius "pertaining to a mission," from Latin missionem (see mission).

Related entries & more 
emit (v.)

"to send forth, throw or give out," 1620s, from Latin emittere "send forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Emitted; emitting.

Related entries & more 
demiss (adj.)

"submissive, humble, lowly," 1570s, from Latin demissus "let down, lowered," past participle of demittere, literally "to send down," from de "down" (see de-) + mittere "to let go, send, release" (see mission).

Related entries & more 
transmit (v.)
c. 1400, from Latin transmittere "send across, cause to go across, transfer, pass on," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission). Related: Transmitted; transmitting.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
submit (v.)
late 14c., "to place (oneself) under the control of another, to yield oneself," from Latin submittere "to yield, lower, let down, put under, reduce," from sub "under" (see sub-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Transitive sense of "refer to another for consideration" first recorded 1550s. Related: Submitted; submitting.
Related entries & more 
demit (v.)

early 15c., demitten, "to run or flow down," also figurative, "to humble oneself," from Old French demetre "to send, put, or let down," and directly from Latin demittere "to send down," from de "down" (see de-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

Related entries & more 
missive (n.)

by c. 1500, "a written message sent by superior authority; a commandment," noun use of the adjective (mid-15c.) meaning "sent by superior authority" (in phrase lettres missives) from Medieval Latin missivus "for sending, sent," especially in littera missiva "letters sent," from Latin missus, past participle of mittere "to send" (see mission).

Related entries & more 
admissible (adj.)

1610s, "allowable," from French admissible, from past participle stem of Latin admittere "allow to enter, admit, give entrance," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Meaning "capable of being allowed entrance" is from 1775; specific sense of "capable of being used in a legal decision or judicial investigation" is recorded from 1849.

Related entries & more 
intermit (v.)
1540s, "to interrupt" (obsolete); 1570s as "to discontinue for a time, suspend" (trans.) and "cease for a time" (intrans.), from Latin intermittere "to leave off, leave an interval, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting.
Related entries & more