Etymology
Advertisement
misdivision (n.)

"a wrong or faulty division," 1835, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + division. Or perhaps a back-formation from misdivide, which is attested by 1827. Related: Misdivided; misdividing. For examples of the thing, see N.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ought (n.)

"zero, cipher," 1844, probably a misdivision of a nought (see nought; for misdivision, see N); the meaning probably was influenced by aught "anything."

Related entries & more 
Luxor 
place in Egypt, from a misdivision of Arabic al-uqsur, plural of al-qasr, which is from an Arabicized form of Latin castrum "fortified camp" (see castle (n.)). Remains of Roman camps are nearby.
Related entries & more 
nother (pron.)

word formed from misdivision of another as a nother (see N for other examples), c. 1300. From 14c.-16c. no nother is sometimes encountered as a misdivision of none other or perhaps as an emphatic negative; Old English had noðer as a contraction of ne oðer "no other." Hence Middle English nother-gates (adv.) "not otherwise" (c. 1300).

Related entries & more 
nugget (n.)

1852, "lump of gold," probably from southwestern England dialectal nug "lump," a word of unknown origin [OED]. Another theory is that it is from a misdivision of an ingot. Transferred sense (of truth, etc.) is from 1859.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
alot (n.)

misdivision of a lot (see lot (n.)), in which sense it begins to turn up in print transcripts c. 1960; also an alternative spelling of allot.

Related entries & more 
newt (n.)

"small, tailed, salamander-like amphibian," early 15c., neute, newte, a misdivision of an ewte (see N for other examples), a variation of Middle English evete (see eft). "Eft, though now only provincial, is strictly the correct form" [Century Dictionary]. OED notes that "the change of v to w is unusual."

Related entries & more 
good den 
salutation, Elizabethan corruption of good e'en, itself a contraction of good even "good evening," which is attested from c. 1500, first as gud devon, showing a tendency toward misdivision. See good (adj.) + even (n.).
Related entries & more 
atomies (n.)
1590s, "atoms," also "diminutive beings," from atomy, from Latin atomi, plural of atomus (see atom), but taken as a singular in English and re-pluralized in the native way. Perhaps also in some cases a plural of atomy (from misdivision of anatomy).
Related entries & more 
aitchbone (n.)
"rump-bone in cattle," also the cut of beef which includes this, late 15c., a misdivision of Middle English nache-bone (see N), from nache "buttocks" (c. 1300), from Old French nache, nage "the buttocks," from Medieval Latin *natica, from Latin natis "buttock," from PIE *not- "buttock, back."
Related entries & more