Etymology
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mischievous (adj.)

early 14c., "unfortunate, disastrous, miserably, wretchedly," probably from mischief + -ous. Sense of "playfully malicious or annoying" is attested by 1670s. "The stressing on the second syllable was common in literature till about 1700; it is now dialectal, vulgar, and jocular" [OED]. Related: Mischievously; mischievousness.

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roguish (adj.)

1570s, "pertaining to or appropriate to rogues," from rogue + -ish. From 1580s as "playfully mischievous." Related: Roguishly; roguishness.

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Peck's bad boy 

"unruly or mischievous child," 1883, from fictional character created by George Wilbur Peck (1840-1916).

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puckish (adj.)

"resembling the fairy Puck; merry and mischievous; like what Puck might do," 1867, from Puck + -ish. Related: Puckishly; puckishness.

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pestilential (adj.)

late 14c., pestilencial, "producing or tending to produce an infectious disease, characterized by the plague," from Medieval Latin pestilentialis, from Latin pestilentia "plague" (see pestilence). Weakened sense of "mischievous, pernicious" is from 1530s. Related: Pestilentially.

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hobgoblin (n.)
1520s, from hob "elf," from Hobbe, a variant of Rob (see Hob), short for Robin Goodfellow, elf character in German folklore, + goblin. Mischievous sprite, hence "something that causes fear or disquiet" (1709).
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mockery (n.)

early 15c., mokkerie, "act of derision or scorn; ridicule, disparagement; a delusion, sham, pretense," from Old French mocquerie "sneering, mockery, sarcasm" (13c., Modern French moquerie), from moquer (see mock (v.)). From mid-15c. as "joking, making mischievous pleasantries." Mockage also was common 16c.-17c.

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pestilent (adj.)

late 14c., "contaminated with dangerous disease; deadly, poisonous," from Latin pestilentem (nominative pestilens) "infected, unhealthy," from pestilis "of the nature of a plague," from pestis "deadly contagious disease" (see pest (n.)). Transferred sense of "mischievous, pernicious, hurtful to health or morals" is from 1510s; weakened sense of "troublesome" is from 1590s. Related: Pestilently.

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wag (n.1)
"person fond of making jokes," 1550s, perhaps a shortening of waghalter "gallows bird," person destined to swing in a noose or halter, applied humorously to mischievous children, from wag (v.) + halter. Or possibly directly from wag (v.); compare wagger "one who stirs up or agitates" (late 14c.).
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pestiferous (adj.)

mid-15c., pestiferus, "bringing plague, plague-bearing, pestilential," also in a weakened or figurative sense, "mischievous, malignant, pernicious, hurtful to morals or society," from of Latin pestiferus "that brings plague or destruction," variant of pestifer "bringing plague, destructive, noxious," from pestis "plague" (see pest) + ferre "carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children." Related: Pestiferously; pestiferousness.

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