Etymology
Advertisement
misanthrope (n.)

"one who hates humankind, one who distrusts human character or motives," 1560s, from Greek misanthrōpos "hating mankind," from misein "to hate" (see miso-) + anthrōpos "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"). Alternative form misanthropist is attested from 1650s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
misanthropic (adj.)

"having the character of a misanthrope, hating mankind as a race," 1739, from misanthrope + -ic. Earlier was misanthropical (1620s).

Related entries & more 
misanthropy (n.)

"hatred or dislike of mankind, the habit of taking the worst possible view of human character and motives," 1650s, from Greek misanthrōpia "hatred of mankind," from misanthrōpos "hating mankind" (see misanthrope).

Related entries & more 
*ner- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "man," also "vigorous, vital, strong."

It forms all or part of: Alexander; Andrew; andro-; androgynous; android; Andromache; Andromeda; andron; anthropo-; anthropocentric; anthropology; anthropomorphous; Leander; lycanthropy; Lysander; misanthrope; pachysandra; philander; philanthropy; polyandria; polyandrous.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit nar-, Armenian ayr, Welsh ner "a man;" Greek aner (genitive andros) "a man, a male" (as opposed to a woman, a youth, or a god).

Related entries & more 
Timon (n.)
"misanthrope," from Timon, name of a misanthrope who lived in Athens during the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.E.), hero of Shakespeare's "Timon of Athens" (c. 1605).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
man-hater (n.)

"misanthrope," 1570s, from man (n.) + hater. Old English had mannhata "man-hater." Often in old use of Timon of Athens. Meaning "a woman who hates the male sex" is by 1839.

Related entries & more