Etymology
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mis- (1)

prefix of Germanic origin affixed to nouns and verbs and meaning "bad, wrong," from Old English mis-, from Proto-Germanic *missa- "divergent, astray" (source also of Old Frisian and Old Saxon mis-, Middle Dutch misse-, Old High German missa-, German miß-, Old Norse mis-, Gothic missa-), perhaps literally "in a changed manner," and with a root sense of "difference, change" (compare Gothic misso "mutually"), and thus possibly from PIE *mit-to-, from root *mei- (1) "to change."

Productive as word-forming element in Old English (as in mislæran "to give bad advice, teach amiss"). In 14c.-16c. in a few verbs its sense began to be felt as "unfavorably," and it came to be used as an intensive prefix with words already expressing negative feeling (as in misdoubt). Practically a separate word in Old and early Middle English (and often written as such). Old English also had an adjective (mislic "diverse, unlike, various") and an adverb (mislice "in various directions, wrongly, astray") derived from it, corresponding to German misslich (adj.). It has become confused with mis- (2).

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spend (v.)
"to pay out or away" (money or wealth), Old English -spendan (in forspendan "use up"), from Medieval Latin spendere, a shortening of Latin expendere "to weigh out money, pay down" (see expend) or possibly of dispendere "to pay out." A general Germanic borrowing (Old High German spendon, German and Middle Dutch spenden, Old Norse spenna). In reference to labor, thoughts, time, etc., attested from c. 1300. Intransitive sense "exhaust, wear (oneself) out" is from 1590s (see spent).
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mis- (2)

word-forming element of Latin origin (in mischief, miscreant, misadventure, misnomer, etc.), from Old French mes- "bad, badly, wrong, wrongly," from Vulgar Latin *minus-, from Latin minus "less" (from suffixed form of PIE root *mei- (2) "small"), which was not used as a prefix in Latin but in the Romanic languages was affixed to words as a depreciative or negative element. The form in French perhaps was influenced in Old French by *miss-, the Frankish (Germanic) form of mis- (1).

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misspend (v.)

also mis-spend, "to spend amiss or wastefully, use improperly, make a bad or useless expenditure of," late 14c.; see mis- (1) + spend. Related: Misspent (as an adjective, "badly or uselessly employed," since mid-15c. frequently modifying youth); misspending.

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spendthrift (n.)
c. 1600, from spend (v.) + thrift (n.) in sense of "savings, profits, wealth." Replaced earlier scattergood (1570s) and spend-all (1550s). From c. 1600 as an adjective.
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overspend (v.)
1610s, "to wear out," from over- + spend. Meaning "to spend more than is necessary" is attested from 1857. Related: Overspent; overspending.
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outspend (v.)

mid-15c., outspenden, "to consume totally, use up," from out- + spend (v.). Meaning "to spend more than another or others" is from 1840. Related: Outspent; outspending. Outspent is attested from 1650s as "exhausted, thoroughly spent or wearied."

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spending (n.)
late Old English, verbal noun from spend (v.). Spending-money is from 1590s.
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misspell (v.)

also mis-spell, "spell incorrectly," 1650s, from mis- (1) + spell (v.1). Related: Misspelled; misspelling.

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lavish (v.)
"spend or bestow profusely," 1540s, from lavish (adj.). Related: Lavished; lavisher; lavishing.
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