Etymology
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mint (n.1)

aromatic herb, plant of the genus Mentha, Old English minte (8c.), from West Germanic *minta (source also of Old Saxon minta, Middle Dutch mente, Old High German minza, German Minze), a borrowing from Latin menta, mentha "mint," itself from Greek minthe, personified as a nymph transformed into an herb by Proserpine, which is probably a loan-word from a lost Mediterranean language. For mint-julep, see julep.

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mint (n.2)

place where money is coined, early 15c., from Old English mynet "coin, coinage, money" (8c.), from West Germanic *munita (source also of Old Saxon munita, Old Frisian menote, Middle Dutch munte, Old High German munizza, German münze), from Latin moneta "mint" (see money (n.) ). An earlier word for "place where money is coined" was minter (early 12c.). General sense of "a vast sum of money" is from 1650s. Mint-mark, "mark placed upon a coin to indicate the mint where it was struck," is from 1797.

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mint (v.)

"to stamp metal to make coins," 1540s, from mint (n.2). Related: Minted; minting. Old English had the agent noun mynetere (Middle English minter) "one who stamps coins to create money," from Late Latin monetarius.

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mint (adj.)
"perfect" (like a freshly minted coin), 1887 (in mint condition), from mint (n.2).
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minty (adj.)

"full of or tasting of mint," 1867, from mint (n.1) + -y (2). Related: Mintiness.

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spearmint (n.)
1530s, from spear (n.2) + mint (n.1). "Said to be a corruption of spire-mint, with reference to the pyramidal inflorescence" [Century Dictionary].
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peppermint (n.)

herb native to Europe, naturalized in the U.S., noted for its aromatic, pungent oil, 1690s, from pepper (n.) + mint (n.1). Compare Dutch pepermunt, German Pfeffermünze. As "candy drop flavored with peppermint" by 1829 (peppermint-drop is by 1799).

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menthol (n.)

white crystalline substance, 1862, from German Menthol, coined 1861 by Alphons Oppenheim from Latin mentha "mint" (see mint (n.1)) + oleum "oil" (see oil (n.)). So called because it was first obtained from oil of peppermint. Menthol cigarette is by 1934.

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money (n.)

mid-13c., monie, "funds, means, anything convertible into money;" c. 1300, "coinage, coin, metal currency," from Old French monoie "money, coin, currency; change" (Modern French monnaie), from Latin moneta "place for coining money, mint; coined money, money, coinage," from Moneta, a title or surname of the Roman goddess Juno, near whose temple on the Capitoline Hill money was coined (and in which perhaps the precious metal was stored); from monere "advise, warn, admonish" (on the model of stative verbs in -ere; see monitor (n.)), by tradition with the sense of "admonishing goddess," which is sensible, but the etymology is difficult. A doublet of mint (n.2)).

It had been justly stated by a British writer that the power to make a small piece of paper, not worth one cent, by the inscribing of a few names, to be worth a thousand dollars, was a power too high to be entrusted to the hands of mortal man. [John C. Calhoun, speech, U.S. Senate, Dec. 29, 1841] 

Extended by early 19c. to include paper recognized and accepted as a substitute for coin. The highwayman's threat your money or your life is attested by 1774. Phrase in the money (1902) originally referred to "one who finishes among the prize-winners" (in a horse race, etc.). The challenge to put (one's) money where (one's) mouth is is recorded by 1942 in African-American vernacular. Money-grub for "avaricious person, one who is sordidly intent on amassing money" is from 1768; money-grubber is by 1835. The image of money burning a hole in someone's pocket is attested from 1520s (brennyd out the botom of hys purs).

I am not interested in money but in the things of which money is the symbol. [Henry Ford]
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moneyer (n.)

c. 1300, "a money-changer;" early 15c., "one who coins money, a minter," from Old French monier (Modern French monnayeur), from Late Latin monetarius "a mint-master," originally "of a mint," from Latin moneta "mint; coinage" (see money (n.)). 

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