Etymology
Advertisement
mini (n.)

1961, abbreviation of mini-car, a small car made by British Leyland (formerly British Motor Corp.). As an abbreviation of miniskirt, it is attested from 1966.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mini-series (n.)

also miniseries "television series of short duration and on a single theme," 1971, from mini- + series.

Related entries & more 
mini- 

word-forming element meaning "miniature, minor," abstracted from miniature, with sense perhaps influenced by minimum. The vogue for mini- as a prefix in English word coinage dates from c. 1960; minicam for "miniature camera" (1937) is an early use.

Related entries & more 
miniskirt (n.)

also mini-skirt, "skirt with a hem-line well above the knee," 1965, from mini- + skirt (n.); reputedly the invention of French fashion designer André Courrèges (1923-2016).

"The miniskirt enables young ladies to run faster, and because of it, they may have to." [John V. Lindsay, New York Times, Jan. 13, 1967]

Related: Miniskirted.

Related entries & more 
bleep (v.)

1957, "make an electronic noise" (originally in reference to Sputnik), from bleep (n.); specific sense of "edit a sound over a word deemed unfit for broadcast" is from 1964. Related: Bleeped; bleeping. Bleeper "pager consisting of a mini radio receiver that announces reception of signals by emitting a bleeping noise" is from 1964.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
miniature (n.)

1580s, "a reduced image, anything represented on a greatly reduced scale," especially a painting of very small dimensions, from Italian miniatura "manuscript illumination or small picture," from past participle of miniare "to illuminate a manuscript," from Latin miniare "to paint red," from minium "red lead," used in ancient times to make red ink, a word said to be of Iberian origin. Sense development is because pictures in medieval manuscripts were small, but no doubt there was influence as well from the similar-sounding Latin words that express smallness: minor, minimus, minutus, etc.

Related entries & more 
ministerial (adj.)

1560s, in religion, "pertaining to the office, character, or habits of a clergyman;" 1650s, in politics, "of or pertaining to a minister or ministry of the state;" in some uses from French ministériel and directly from Medieval Latin ministerialis "pertaining to service, of a minister," from Latin ministerium "office, service, attendance, ministry," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)). In some cases probably directly from minister or ministry. Related: Ministerially.

Related entries & more 
mining (n.)

1520s, "the business or work of a miner," verbal noun from mine (v.1). From c. 1300 as "the undermining of walls or towers in a military attack." Mining-camp "temporary settlement for mining purposes" is by 1853, in a California context.

Related entries & more 
minimization (n.)

"act or process of reducing to the lowest terms or proportions," 1802, from minimize + noun ending -ation.

Related entries & more 
ministerium (n.)

"ordained ministers of a (Lutheran) church district," 1818, from Latin ministerium (see ministry).

Related entries & more