Etymology
Advertisement
mingle (v.)

mid-15c., menglen, transitive, "mix, blend, form a combination of, bring (something and something else) together," frequentative of Middle English myngen "to mix," from Old English mengan (related to second element in among), from Proto-Germanic *mangjan "to knead together" (source also of Old Saxon mengian, Old Norse menga, Old Frisian mendza, German mengen), from a nasalized form of PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit."

The formation may have been suggested by cognate Middle Dutch mengelen. Intransitive sense of "to be or become joined, combined, or mixed" is by 1520s. Of persons, "enter into intimate relation, join with others, be sociable," from c. 1600. Related: Mingled; mingling; minglement.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
intermingle (v.)
late 15c. (trans.), from inter- "between" + mingle (v.). Intransitive sense from 1620s. Related: Intermingled; intermingling.
Related entries & more 
comingle (v.)

"to mingle together," c. 1600, the better (because mingle is not from Latin), but less-used, English form of commingle. Related: comingled; comingling.

Related entries & more 
commingle (v.)

1620s, "to mix together, blend" (intransitive), from com- + mingle. Also see comingle. Transitive sense attested by 1840. Related: Commingled; commingling.

Related entries & more 
mongrel (n.)

mid-15c., "individual or breed of dog resulting from repeated crossings or mixture of several different varieties," from obsolete mong "mixture," from Old English gemong "mingling" (base of among), from Proto-Germanic *mangjan "to knead together" (source of mingle), from a nasalized form of PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit." With pejorative suffix -rel.

The distinction between a mongrel and a hybrid (a cross between two different breeds) is not always observed. Meaning "person not of pure race" is attested from 1540s. As an adjective, "of a mixed or impure breed," from 1570s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*mag- 
also *mak-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to knead, fashion, fit." It forms all or part of: amass; among; macerate; magma; make; mason; mass (n.1) "lump, quantity, size;" match (n.2) "one of a pair, an equal;" mingle; mongrel.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek magis "kneaded mass, cake," mageus "one who kneads, baker;" Latin macerare "soften, make soft, soak, steep;" Lithuanian minkyti "to knead;" Old Church Slavonic mazo "to anoint, smear;" Breton meza "to knead;" Old English macian "to make, form, construct, do," German machen "to make;" Middle Irish maistir "to churn."
Related entries & more 
melange (n.)

"a mixture, a medley," usually "an uncombined mingling on elements, objects, or individuals," 1650s, from French mélange (15c.), from mêler "to mix, mingle," from Old French mesler "to mix, meddle, mingle" (see meddle).

Related entries & more 
sozzled (adj.)
"drunk," 1886, from sozzle "to mix or mingle sloppily" (1836).
Related entries & more 
admix (v.)
"mingle" (something, with something else), 1530s, a back-formed verb; see admixture. Related: Admixing.
Related entries & more 
metis (n.)

"person of mixed parentage," especially French Canadian and North American Indian, 1816, from French métis, from Late Latin mixticus "of mixed race," from Latin mixtus "mixed," past participle of miscere "to mix, mingle" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix"). Compare mestizo.

Related entries & more