Etymology
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mimic (n.)

"one who or that which imitates, a mime," 1580s, from Latin mimicus, from Greek mimikos "of or pertaining to mimes," from mimos "mime" (see mime (n.)).

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mimic (v.)

"act in imitation of, imitate or copy in speech or action," 1680s, from mimic (n.). Related: Mimicked; mimicking.

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mimic (adj.)

"acting as a mime, practicing imitation, consisting of or resulting from mimicry," 1590s, from Latin mimicus, from Greek mimikos "of or pertaining to mimes," verbal adjective from mimeisthai "to mimic, represent, imitate, portray," in art, "to express by means of imitation," from mimos "mime" (see mime (n.)).

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mimicry (n.)

"an act of imitation in speech, manner, or appearance," 1680s; see mimic (adj.) + -ry. The zoological sense of "the external simulation of something else in form, color, etc." is from 1861.

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gesticulate (v.)
c. 1600, from Latin gesticulatus, past participle of gesticulari "to gesture, mimic," from gesticulus "a mimicking gesture" (see gesticulation). Related: Gesticulated; gesticulating.
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imitator (n.)

1520s, from French imitateur (14c.) or directly from Latin imitator "a copyist; a mimic," from imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").

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mime (n.)

c. 1600, "a buffoon who practices gesticulations" [Johnson], from French mime "mimic actor" (16c.) and directly from Latin mimus, from Greek mimos "imitator, mimic, actor, mime, buffoon," a word of unknown origin.  In reference to a performance, 1932 as "a pantomime," earlier (1640s) in a classical context: The ancient mimes of the Italian Greeks and Romans were dramatic performances, generally vulgar, with spoken lines, consisting of farcical mimicry of real events and persons.

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puppetry (n.)

1520s, "mimic action, make-believe;" see puppet (n.) + -ry. From 1590s as "finery" (as that of a doll or puppet); by 1610s as "a puppet-show."

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monkey (v.)

1859, "to mock, mimic" (as a monkey does), from monkey (n.). Meaning "play foolish tricks" is from 1881. To monkey (with) "act in an idle or meddlesome manner" is by 1884. Related: Monkeyed; monkeying.

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ethology (n.)

late 17c., "mimicry, art of depicting characters by mimic gestures," from Latin ethologia, from Greek ēthologia, from ēthos "character" (see ethos). Taken by Mill as "science of character formation" (1843); as a branch of zoology, "study of instincts," from 1897. Related: Ethological.

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