Etymology
Advertisement
mighty (adj.)

"possessed of or endowed with might; having much ability, strength, or power," Old English mihtig, earlier mæhtig, from Proto-Germanic *mahtiga- (source also of Old Frisian mechtig, Old Saxon mahtig, Dutch machtig, German mächtig), from the source of might (n.). As an adverb, "very, exceedingly, greatly," it is attested from c. 1300, though such use now is considered colloquial.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mightiness (n.)

"power, greatness," also "grandeur," Old English mihtinesse; see mighty + -ness.

Related entries & more 
mightily (adv.)

"in a mighty manner; by great power, force, or strength," Old English mihtiglice; see mighty + -ly (2).

Related entries & more 
almighty (adj.)

Old English ælmihtig "all-powerful," also a by-name of God; compound of æl (see all) + mihtig (see mighty); common Germanic (cognates: Old Saxon alomahtig, Old High German alamahtic, German allmächtig, Old Norse almattigr), perhaps an early Germanic loan-translation of Latin omnipotens (see omnipotent). Originally only of deities; general use is by late 14c.

The almighty dollar, that great object of universal devotion throughout our land. [Washington Irving, "The Creole Village," in The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, November 1836]

Related: Almightily; almightiness. A 15c. text translates omnipotencia with allmyghtyhede "almightihood."

Related entries & more 
huge (adj.)
mid-12c., apparently a shortening of Old French ahuge, ahoge "extremely large, enormous; mighty, powerful," itself of uncertain origin. Related: Hugeness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Hogen-Mogen (n.)
"the Netherlands," 1630s, also an adjective, "Dutch" (1670s), old slang, from Dutch Hoog en Mogend "high and mighty," an honorific of the States General of Holland.
Related entries & more 
forcible (adj.)
early 15c., "powerful, violent; done by force," from Old French forcible "strong, powerful, mighty," from forcier "conquer by violence" (see force (v.)). From 1550s as "possessing force." Related: Forcibly.
Related entries & more 
Bridget 

fem. proper name, from Irish Brighid, goddess associated with fire, spring, fertility, healing, poetry and smithcraft, from brigh "strength," from Celtic *brig-o-, from PIE *bhrgh-nt- "high, mighty," from root *bhergh- (2) "high."

Related entries & more 
jeroboam (n.)
type of large wine bottle, 1816, from Biblical name Jeroboam, "a mighty man of valour" (I Kings xi.28) "who made Israel to sin" (xiv.16), from Hebrew Yarobh'am, literally "let the people increase."
Related entries & more 
hieratic (adj.)
"pertaining to sacred things," 1660s, from Latin hieraticus, from Greek hieratikos "pertaining to a priest or his office, priestly, devoted to sacred purposes," from hierateia "priesthood," from hiereus "priest," from hieros "sacred, holy, hallowed; superhuman, mighty; divine" (see ire). Related: Hieratical (1650s).
Related entries & more