Etymology
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metric (adj.)

"pertaining to the system of weights and measures based on the meter," 1855, from French métrique, from mèter (see meter (n.2)). In this sense, metrical is attested from 1797. Metric system is attested by 1855.

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metric (n.)

"science of versification," 1760, from Latinized form of Greek he metrikē "prosody," plural of metron "meter, a verse; that by which anything is measured; measure, length, size, limit, proportion" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Middle English had metrik "the branch of music which deals with measure or time" (late 15c.), from Medieval Latin metricus.

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metrics (n.)

"the study of meter, the art of versification," 1892, variant of metric (n.); also see -ics.

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metricize (v.)

also metricise, "convert to the metric system," by 1852, from metric (adj.) + -ize. Related: Metricized; metricizing. Earlier "to convert to poetic meter" (1850; see metric (n.)).

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econometric (adj.)
1933, from economy + -metric. Related: Econometrics.
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-metric 
word-forming element representing -metry + -ic.
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isometric (adj.)
1838, literally "of the same measure," from iso- "the same, equal" + -metric. The components are Greek: isos "equal, identical" + metron "a measure." Originally a method of using perspective in drawing; later in reference to crystals. The physiological sense relating to muscular action is from 1889, from German isometrisch in this sense (1882).
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radiometric (adj.)

"pertaining to the radiometer or to experiments performed by it," 1877, from radiometer "instrument to transform radiant energy into mechanical work" (1875), radiometry, from radio-, here indicating "radiant energy," + -metric. Previously radiometer was the name of an old cross-staff instrument for measuring angles. Radiometric dating is attested from 1906.

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*me- (2)
*mē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to measure." Some words may belong instead to root *med- "to take appropriate measures."

It forms all or part of: amenorrhea; centimeter; commensurate; diameter; dimension; gematria; geometry; immense; isometric; meal (n.1) "food, time for eating;" measure; menarche; meniscus; menopause; menses; menstrual; menstruate; mensural; meter (n.1) "poetic measure;" meter (n.2) unit of length; meter (n.3) "device for measuring;" -meter; Metis; metric; metrical; metronome; -metry; Monday; month; moon; parameter; pentameter; perimeter; piecemeal; semester; symmetry; thermometer; trigonometry; trimester.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mati "measures," matra "measure;" Avestan, Old Persian ma- "to measure;" Greek metron "measure," metra "lot, portion;" Latin metri "to measure."
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tonne (n.)
1877, French form of ton (n.1), adopted for English use to denote a metric ton (1,000 kg.).
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