Etymology
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method (n.)

early 15c., "regular, systematic treatment of disease," from Latin methodus "way of teaching or going," from Greek methodos "scientific inquiry, method of inquiry, investigation," originally "pursuit, a following after," from meta "in pursuit or quest of" (see meta-) + hodos "a method, system; a way or manner" (of doing, saying, etc.), also "a traveling, journey," literally "a path, track, road," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus).

Meaning "any way of doing anything, orderly regulation of conduct with a view to the attainment of an end" is from 1580s; that of "orderliness, regularity" is from 1610s. Meaning "a system or complete sent of rules for attaining an end" is from 1680s. In reference to a theory of acting associated with Russian director Konstantin Stanislavski (1863-1938), it is attested from 1923.

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methodize (v.)

1580s, "to make methodical, reduce to method," from method + -ize. Intransitive sense of "to be methodical, use method" is by 1771. Related: Methodized; methodizer; methodizing. Methodization "act or process of making methodical" is by 1808.

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methodical (adj.)

1560s, "pertaining to or characterized by method," from French methodique and directly from Late Latin methodicus, from Greek methodikos, from methodos (see method). Meaning "systematic, orderly" is by 1660s. Related: Methodically.

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methodology (n.)

"branch of logic that shows how abstract logical principles are to be applied to the production of knowledge," 1800, from French méthodologie or directly from Modern Latin methodologia; see method + -ology. Often simply a longer variant of method.

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methodist (n.)

1590s, "one who is characterized by strict adherence to method," from method + -ist. With a capital M-, it refers to the Protestant religious denomination founded 1729 at Oxford University by John and Charles Wesley. The name had been used at least since 1686 for various new methods of worship; it was applied to the Wesleys by their fellow-students at Oxford for their methodical habits in study and religious life. Johnson (1755) describes them as "One of a new kind of puritans lately arisen, so called from their profession to live by rules and in constant method." Related: Methodism.

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weave (n.)
1580s, "something woven," from weave (v.). Meaning "method or pattern of weaving" is from 1888.
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shorthand (n.)
method of rapid writing, 1636, from short (adj.) in the "rapid" sense + hand (n.) "handwriting."
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Stanislavsky (adj.)
in reference to a method of acting, 1924, from Russian actor and director Konstantin Stanislavsky (1863-1938).
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tae kwon do 
1967, from Korean, said to represent tae "kick" + kwon "fist" + do "art, way, method."
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tie-dye (v.)
1904, from tie (v.) + dye (v.) in reference to the method. Related: Tie-dyed.
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