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merger (n.)

1728 in legal sense, "extinguishment by absorption," originally of real estate titles, from merge (v.), on analogy of French infinitives used as nouns (see waiver). From 1889 in the business sense "extinguishment of a security for a debt by the creditor's acceptance of a higher security;" not common until c. 1926. General meaning "any act of merging" is by 1881.

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waiver (n.)
"act of waiving," 1620s (modern usage is often short for waiver clause); from Anglo-French legal usage of infinitive as a noun (see waive). Baseball waivers is recorded from 1907. Other survivals of noun use of infinitives in Anglo-French legalese include disclaimer, merger, rejoinder, misnomer, ouster, retainer, attainder.
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sexpert (n.)
"sex therapist," 1924, from jocular merger of sex (n.) + expert.
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Paypal (n.)
e-commerce money transfer business, formed 2000 by merger of earlier firms.
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ginormous (adj.)
by 1948, perhaps 1942, apparently originally a World War II military colloquialism, from a merger of gigantic + enormous.
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chifferobe (n.)

also chifforobe; "article of furniture having drawers as well as space for hanging clothes," 1903, from merger of chiffonier + wardrobe (n.).

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Creamsicle (n.)

small slab of ice cream surrounded by a layer of fruit-flavored water ice and mounted on a stick, 1932, a trademark name, merger of ice-cream and Popsicle.

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buttercup (n.)
common name of a type of small wildflower with a yellow bloom, 1777, perhaps (OED) a merger of two older names, gold-cups and butterflower. See butter (n.) + cup (n.).
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