Etymology
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fore-mentioned (adj.)
also forementioned, 1580s; see fore- + mention (v.). A verb foremention is attested only from 1650s. Old English had foremearcod in this sense.
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unmentionable (adj.)

"that may not be or should not be mentioned," 1833, from un- (1) "not" + mentionable (adj.). Humorous use of unmentionables "trousers" is attested by 1806 (see inexpressible); from 1910 as "underwear," both on notion of "articles of dress not to be mentioned in polite circles."

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mentionable (adj.)

"that can be or is worthy to be mentioned," 1630s, from mention (v.) + -able.

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larrup (v.)
"to beat, thrash," 1823, of unknown origin, possibly related to Dutch larpen "to thrash." First mentioned as a Suffolk dialect word.
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snow-plow (n.)
also snowplow, snow-plough, 1792, first mentioned in a New Hampshire context, from snow (n.) + plow (n.).
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Sudeten 
from German, named for the Sudeten Mountains; mentioned by Ptolemy (2c.) but the name is of unknown origin, perhaps Illyrian.
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aforesaid (adj.)
"mentioned before in a preceding part of the same writing or speech," a common legal word, late 14c., from afore + said.
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said (adj.)

"named or mentioned before," c. 1300, past-participle adjective from say (v.). Expression all is said and done is from 1550s.

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Ophir 
name of a place mentioned in Old Testament as a source for fine gold; location still unknown. Hence Ophir-gold (1610s).
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aforementioned (adj.)

"mentioned before," 1580s, from afore + past participle of mention (v.). Afore-written is from mid-15c.; aforenamed from c.1600.

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