Etymology
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memorable (adj.)

mid-15c., "worthy to be remembered, not to be forgotten," from Latin memorabilis "that may be told; worthy of being remembered, remarkable," from memorare "to bring to mind," from memor "mindful of" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). Related: Memorably; memorableness.

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memorability (n.)

"memorableness, quality of being memorable," 1660s, from memorable + -ity.

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immemorable (adj.)
"not memorable," 1550s, from Latin immemorabilis "not worth mentioning; silent," from assimilated form of in- "not" (see in- (1)) + memorabilis (see memorable). In English it occasionally has been used to mean "old beyond memory," but that sense is best left to immemorial.
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memorabilia (n.)

"things worth remembering," 1792, from Latin memorabilia "notable achievements," noun use of neuter plural of memorabilis "worthy of being remembered" (see memorable). The use of the word in English probably was suggested by Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates. Originally of writings; by 1922 it was being used in reference to objects and relics that serve to recall something to the memory, things associated with some person, place, or event.

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*(s)mer- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to remember." 

It forms all or part of: commemorate; commemoration; mourn; memo; memoir; memorable; memorandum; memorial; memorious; memorize; memory; remember.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit smarati "remembers;" Avestan mimara "mindful;" Greek merimna "care, thought," mermeros "causing anxiety, mischievous, baneful;" Latin memoria "memory, remembrance, faculty of remembering," memor "mindful, remembering;" Serbo-Croatian mariti "to care for;" Welsh marth "sadness, anxiety;" Old Norse Mimir, name of the giant who guards the Well of Wisdom; Old English gemimor "known," murnan "to mourn, remember sorrowfully;" Dutch mijmeren "to ponder."

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memorial (adj.)

late 14c., "memorable, excellent," also "remembered, committed to memory," from Old French memorial "mindful of, remembering" (Modern French mémorial), and directly from Latin memorialis "of or belonging to memory," from memoria "memory" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). From mid-15c. as "preservative of memory, serving for commemoration."

A Middle English word for "having to do with memory" was memorative (late 14c.), from Old French memoratif, from Latin memorativus. Though useful, it apparently has not survived.

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printer (n.)

"person who prints books, etc.; one who understands and carries on the business of typographical printing," c. 1500, agent noun from print (v.). Earlier as "a signet or seal" (early 15c.). As a mechanical device that prints, presses, or stamps by impression, from 1859, originally in telegraphy. In the computer sense, from 1946. The Printer's bible (c. 1702) was so called from the erroneous substitution of printers for princes in Psalms cxix.161, which led to the memorable misreading:

Printers have persecuted me without a cause.
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ostrich (n.)

"very large flightless bird inhabiting the sandy plains of Africa and Arabia," early 13c., also hostriche, estrich, ostrig, esterige, etc., from Old French ostruce "ostrich" (Modern French autruche) and Medieval Latin ostrica, ostrigius, all from Vulgar Latin avis struthio, from Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird") + Late Latin struthio "ostrich," from Greek strouthion "ostrich," from strouthos megale "big sparrow," the first word perhaps from PIE *trozdo- "thrush" (see thrush (n.1)).

The Greeks also knew the bird as strouthokamelos "camel-sparrow," for its long neck. Among its proverbial peculiarities are indiscriminate voracity (especially a habit of swallowing small bits of iron and stone to aid digestion), a supposed want of regard for its eggs (which are incubated partly by the heat of the sun), and a tendency to hide its head when pursued. Ostriches do put their heads in the sand, but ostrich farmers say they do this in search of something to eat.

Like the Austridge, who hiding her little head, supposeth her great body obscured. ["Something written by occasion of that fatall and memorable accident in the Blacke Friers on Sonday, being the 26. of October 1623"]

Hence expressions cruel as an ostrich (late 14c.); foolish as an ostrich (late 15c.). From the Vulgar Latin word also come Spanish avestruz, Italian struzzo, Old English struta, German Strausz, Dutch struis, Danish struds.

For generic use of "sparrow" for "bird," compare Spanish pájaro, Romanian pasăre "bird," from Latin passer "sparrow."

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