Etymology
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membrane (n.)

early 15c., "thin layer of skin or soft tissue of the body," a term in anatomy, from Latin membrana "a skin, membrane; parchment (skin prepared for writing)," from membrum "limb, member of the body" (see member). The etymological sense is "that which covers the members of the body."

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membranous (adj.)

"having a membrane; of or like a membrane," 1590s, from French membraneux (16c.), from membrane, from Latin membrana "a skin, parchment" (see membrane). The alternative form membraneous is recorded from 1630s.

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meningeal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the meninges," 1802, from Modern Latin meningeus, from meninx "membrane of the brain" (from Greek meninx "membrane," used in medical Latin for "membrane of the brain;" see member) + -al (1).

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chorion (n.)

"outer membrane of the fetus," 1540s, medical Latin, from Greek khorion "membrane enclosing the fetus, afterbirth," from PIE root *ghere- "gut, entrail." Related: Chorionic.

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hymeno- 
word-forming element used in technical and scientific compounds, "membrane," from Greek hymen "membrane" (see hymen).
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conjunctiva (n.)

"mucous membrane of the inner surface of the eyelids," 1540s, medical Latin, short for membrana conjunctiva "conjunctive membrane" (see conjunctive). So called because it conjoins the lids and the globe of the eye. Related: Conjunctival.

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hymen (n.)
1610s, from French hymen (16c.), from medical Latin, ultimately from Greek hymen "membrane (especially 'virginal membrane,' as the membrane par excellence); thin skin," from PIE *syu-men-, from root *syu- "to bind, sew." Specific modern medical meaning begins with Vesalius in the 1555 edition of "De humani corporis fabrica." Apparently not directly connected to Hymen, the god of marriage, but sharing the same root and in folk etymology supposed to be related. Related: Hymenial.
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amnion (n.)
innermost membrane around the embryo of a higher vertebrate (reptiles, birds, mammals), 1660s, Modern Latin, from Greek amnion "membrane around a fetus," originally "vase in which the blood of a sacrifice was caught," which is of unknown origin; sometimes said to be from ame "bucket," or a diminutive of amnos "lamb."
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colitis (n.)

"inflammation of the mucous membrane of the colon," 1860, from combining form of colon (n.2) + -itis "inflammation."

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