Etymology
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medieval (adj.)
Origin and meaning of medieval

"pertaining to or suggestive of the Middle Ages," 1825 (mediaeval), coined in English from Latin medium "the middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle") + aevum "age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity").

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medievalism (n.)

"beliefs and practices characteristic of the Middle Ages," 1846, from medieval + -ism.

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medievally (adv.)

"in a manner reminiscent or characteristic of the Middle Ages," 1844, from medieval + -ly (2).

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medievalist (n.)

1847, "proponent of medieval styles, one who sympathizes with the spirit and principles of the Middle Ages," from medieval + -ist. From 1882 as "one versed in the history of the Middle Ages."

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lai (n.)
type of medieval poem; see lay (n.).
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Lusatian 
1550s, from Medieval Latin Lusatia.
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inhospitable (adj.)

1560s, from French inhospitable (15c.), from Medieval Latin inhospitabilis (equivalent of Latin inhospitalis), from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Medieval Latin hospitabilis (see hospitable).

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indiscreet (adj.)
"imprudent, not discrete, lacking good judgment," early 15c., from Medieval Latin indiscretus, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin discretus "separated, distinct" (in Medieval Latin "discerning, careful"), past participle of discernere "distinguish" (see discern). A Medieval Latin secondary sense of the word that also became indiscrete. Related: Indiscreetly; indiscreetness.
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hernial (adj.)
early 15c., from Medieval Latin hernialis, from hernia (see hernia).
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