Etymology
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mechanism (n.)

1660s, "the structure of a machine, engine, or other contrivance for controlling or utilizing natural forces," from Modern Latin mechanismus, from Greek mēkhanē "machine, instrument, device" (see machine (n.)). Sense of "a mechanical contrivance or agency of any kind" is from 1670s.

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*magh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to be able, have power." It forms all or part of: dismay; deus ex machina; may (v.1) "am able;" might (n.) "bodily strength, power;" main; machine; mechanic; mechanism; mechano-; mage; magi; magic.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mahan "great;" Greek mēkhanē "device, means," mekhos, makhos "means, instrument;" Old Church Slavonic mošti, Russian moč' "can, be able;" Old English mæg "I can," Gothic mag "can, is able," Old High German magan, Old Norse magn "power, might."

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uptick (n.)
"upward trend," 1962, an economist's term, from up (adv.) + tick (v.), in reference to some recording mechanism.
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motorcar (n.)

also motor-car, "horseless carriage, wheeled vehicle which carries its own propelling mechanism," 1895 from motor (n.) + car.

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spacer (n.)
typewriter mechanism and key, 1882, agent noun from space (v.).
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silencer (n.)
c. 1600, "person who silences," agent noun from silence (v.). Meaning "mechanism that stifles the sound of a motor or firearm" is from 1898.
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crankshaft (n.)

also crank-shaft, "shaft turned by a crank," 1803, from crank (v.) + shaft (n.). The basic form of the mechanism appears to date from Roman times.

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defogger (n.)

"mechanism that clears condensed water vapor from the window of an automobile," by 1962, from agent noun from defog (v.) which is attested from 1945 (implied in defogging); see de- + fog.

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derailleur (n.)

type of bicycle gear mechanism, 1930, from French dérailleur (1927), agent noun from dérailler "to go off the rails,"  from de- (see de-) + railler (see rail (n.1)).

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lock-box (n.)
"a box with a lock" (for keeping valuables, etc.), 1855, from lock (n.1) + box (n.1). Earlier as the name of the metal box containing the external lock mechanism on a door.
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