Etymology
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measurement (n.)

1718, "act of measuring," from measure (v.) + -ment. Meaning "a dimension ascertained by measuring" is from 1748. Related: Measurements.

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hydrography (n.)
"science of the measurement and description of the sea," 1550s, from hydro- + -graphy. Related: Hydrographic.
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anthropometric (adj.)
"pertaining to the measurements of the human body," 1871, based on French anthropométrique, from anthropometry "measurement of the human body" + -ic.
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anisometric (adj.)
"of unequal measurement," 1850, perhaps based on German anisometrisch (by 1836); see an- (1) "not" + isometric.
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horometry (n.)

"art of the measurement of time," 1560s, from Greek hōra "any time or period" (see hour) + -metry "a measuring of." Related: Horometrical; horometer.

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anthropometry (n.)
"science of the measurement and dimensions of the parts of the human body," 1839, from anthropo- + -metry "a measuring of." Perhaps modeled on French anthropometrie (by 1806).
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Stanford-Binet 

intelligence test, first published 1916 as a revision and extension of the Binet-Simon intelligence tests, from Stanford University (California, U.S.) + the name of French psychologist Alfred Binet, who devised the attempt at a scientific measurement of intelligence.

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girth (n.)
c. 1300, "belt around a horse's body," from Old Norse gjorð "girdle, belt, hoop," from Proto-Germanic *gertu- (cf Gothic gairda "girdle"), from the same source as girdle and gird. Sense of "measurement around an object" first recorded 1640s.
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psychometry (n.)

1854, "the alleged power possessed by some sensitive persons of reading the history of an object by handling it;" see psycho- + -metry. In reference to the measurement of the duration of mental states from 1879. Related: Psychometric; psychometrical; psychometrist.

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mensurable (adj.)

"capable of being measured," late 14c., from Medieval Latin mensurabilis "able to be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Related: Mensurably; mensurability.

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