Etymology
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measured (adj.)

late 14c., "moderate, temperate" (a sense now obsolete), past-participle adjective from measure (v.) in the sense of "exercise moderation." Meaning "uniform, regular, characterized by uniformity of movement or rhythm" is from c. 1400. That of "ascertained or determined by measuring" is from mid-15c. Meaning "deliberate, restrained" is from 1802.

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measure (v.)

early 14c., mesuren, "to exercise moderation;" mid-14c., "to deal out or divide up by measure," also "to ascertain spatial dimensions, quantity, or capacity of by comparison with a standard;" from Old French mesurer "measure; moderate, curb" (12c.), from Late Latin mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." The native verb is mete. Intransitive sense of "to be of a (specified) measure" is from 1670s. To measure up "have the necessary abilities" is 1910, American English. Related: Measured; measuring.

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mensurable (adj.)

"capable of being measured," late 14c., from Medieval Latin mensurabilis "able to be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Related: Mensurably; mensurability.

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immensurable (adj.)
"immeasurable," c. 1500, from Old French immensurable, from Late Latin immensurabilis, from mensurabilis "able to be measured" (see mensurable).
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statistic (n.)
1852, "one numerical statistic," see statistics. From 1939 in reference to a person (considered as nothing more than an example of some measured quantity).
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quantifiable (adj.)

"that may be measured with regard to quantity," 1868, from quantify + -able. Related: Quantifiably.

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commensurable (adj.)

"having a common measure" (as a yard and a foot, both of which may be measured by inches), 1550s, from Late Latin commensurabilis "having a common measure," from com "together, with" (see com-) + Latin mensurabilis "that can be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

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hygroscope (n.)
"device which indicates atmospheric humidity," 1660s, from hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" + -scope. It indicates the presence of moisture but not the amount (which is measured by a hygrometer). Related: Hygroscopic.
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sidereal (adj.)

also siderial, 1630s, "star-like;" 1640s, "of or pertaining to the stars," earlier sideral (1590s), from French sidereal (16c.), from Latin sidereus "starry, astral, of the constellations," from sidus (genitive sideris) "star, group of stars, constellation," which is of uncertain origin, perhaps from PIE root *sweid- "to shine" (source also of Lithuanian svidus "shining, bright").

Sidereal time is measured by the apparent diurnal motion of the fixed stars. The sidereal day begins and ends with the passage of the vernal equinox over the meridian and is about four minutes shorter than the solar day, measured by the passage of the sun over the meridian.

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rink (n.)

late 14c., "measured ground for a combat, joust, race., etc.," in a Scottish source, and according to OED "Until the latter part of the 19thy cent. only in Sc. use;" probably from Old French renc, reng "row, line," from Frankish or another Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz "something curved, circle" (from PIE root *sker- (2) "to turn, bend"). But probably much confused in meaning with ring (n.1), also used for "area marked out for a sporting contest."

By 1787 (Burns) as "a sheet of ice measured off for curling;" extended to smooth wooden floors for roller-skating by 1875, to ice surfaces measured for ice hockey by 1896. By 1895 as "building containing a skating rink."

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