Etymology
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means (n.)

"course of action," late 14c., from mean (n.); sense of "wealth, resources at one's disposal for accomplishing some object" is recorded by c. 1600. Compare French moyens, German Mittel. Phrase by no means is attested from late 15c. Man of means is from 1620s. Means-test "official inquiry into the private resources of an applicant for public funds" is from 1930.

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production (n.)

c. 1400, produccioun, "a coming into being," from Old French production "production, exhibition" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin productionem (nominative productio) "a prolonging, lengthening," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin producere "bring forth" (see produce (v.)). Meaning "that which is produced" is mid-15c. Colloquial sense of "fuss, commotion" is from 1941, transferred from the meaning "theatrical performance" (1894).

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overproduction (n.)

also over-production, "excessive production, production of commodities in excess of normal demand," 1822, from over- + production.

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mass-produce (v.)

"to manufacture in large quantities by standardized process," 1921, probably a back-formation from mass production (1919),  from mass (n.1) + production (v.). Related: Mass-produced; mass-producing.

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banana republic (n.)

"small Central American state with an economy dependent on banana production," 1901, American English.

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teratogeny (n.)

"the production of monsters," 1855, from terato- + -geny. Related: Teratogenesis.

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pre-packaged (adj.)

"packaged at the site of production," 1944, from pre- "before" + package (v.).

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ovulation (n.)

"formation or production of ova or ovules; discharge of an ovum from the ovary," 1848, from Modern Latin ōvulum (see ovule) + noun ending -ation.

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pathogenesis (n.)

"mode of production, origin, or development of a disease," 1841, earlier in German, from patho- + genesis. Alternative (Englished) form pathogeny is older (1832).

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biosynthesis (n.)

"production of chemical substances by living organisms," 1930; see bio- + synthesis.

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