Etymology
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mature (adj.)

mid-15c., of fruits, "ripe, complete in natural growth or development," also, of deliberations, etc., "careful, well-considered, thorough," from Latin mātūrus "ripe, timely, early" (see mature (v.)). Of persons, "having fully developed powers of body and mind," c. 1600. The euphemistic sense of "older than usual" is by 1953.

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mature (v.)

c. 1400, maturen, "encourage suppuration;" mid-15c., of plants, "cause to ripen, bring to maturity," from Latin mātūrare "to ripen, bring to maturity," from mātūrus "ripe, timely, early," related to māne "early, of the morning," from PIE *meh-tu- "ripeness." De Vaan writes that "The root is probably the same as in mānus 'good'." Intransitive sense of "come to a state of ripeness, become ripe or perfect" is from 1650s. The financial sense of "reach the time for payment" is by 1861. Related: Matured; maturing.

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maturely (adv.)

1530s, "promptly," from mature (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "with full deliberation" is from 1590s; that of "in a way indicative of maturity" is from 1841.

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maturescent (adj.)

1727, "growing ripe, becoming mature," from Latin mātūrescentem (nominative mātūrescens), present participle of mātūrescere "be ripe, ripen," from mātūrus "ripe" (see mature (v.)) + inchoative suffix -escere. Related: Maturescence "process of maturing," by 1803.

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maturity (n.)

early 15c., "maturity of character;" mid-15c., "ripeness, completeness, full development," from Old French maturité and directly from Latin mātūritatem (nominative mātūritas) "ripeness," from mātūrus "ripe" (see mature (v.)). Financial sense "time fixed for payment of an obligation" is by 1815.

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maturation (n.)

early 15c., maturacioun, "the coming to a head of a boil, etc.; a state of producing pus," from Latin mātūrationem (nominative mātūratio) "a hastening, accelerating," noun of action from past-participle stem of mātūrare "to ripen, grow ripe; make ripe; to quicken" (see mature (v.)). The sense of "process of ripening or coming to maturity" is from 1610s of children, 1620s of fruits.

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matutinal (adj.)

"pertaining to the morning; coming or occurring early in the day," 1650s, from Latin mātūtīnalis "pertaining to morning," from mātūtīnus "of or pertaining to the morning," from Mātūta, name of the Roman goddess of dawn, related to mātūrus "early" (see mature (v.)). Earlier in same sense was matutine (mid-15c.). Related: Matutinally.

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immature (adj.)
1540s, "untimely, premature," from Latin immaturus "untimely, unripe," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + maturus "ripe, timely, early" (see mature (v.)). In 16c., usually in reference to early death; main modern sense of "not fully developed" first recorded 1640s. In reference to mentalities or behaviors not considered age-appropriate, from 1920. Related: Immaturely.
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manana 

from Spanish mañana, "tomorrow," from cras manñana, literally "tomorrow early," from Vulgar Latin *maneana "early," from Latin mane "in the morning," from PIE *ma- "good," with notion of "occurring at a good time, timely, early" (compare matins; and see mature (v.)). "Often taken as a synonym of easy-going procrastination said to be found in Spanish-speaking countries" [OED].

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premature (adj.)

mid-15c., "ripe;" 1520s, "existing or done before the proper or usual time, arriving too early at maturity," from Latin praematurus "early ripe" (as fruit), "too early, untimely," from prae "before" (see pre-) + maturus "ripe, timely" (see mature (v.)). Related: Prematurely; prematurity; prematuration.

Premature ejaculation is attested from 1848; the Latin euphemism ejaculatio praecox dates to 1891 in English but was used earlier in German and appears to have been, at first at least, the psychologist's term for it.

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