Etymology
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mathematician (n.)

"one skilled or learned in mathematics," early 15c., mathematicion, from Old French mathematicien, from mathematique, from Latin mathematicus "of or belonging to mathematics," from Latin mathematica (see mathematic).

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Laplace 
in scientific phrases, a reference to French astronomer and mathematician Pierre Simon, Marquis de Laplace (1749-1827). Related: Laplacian (1836).
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Bernoulli's principle 
named for Dutch mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), who published it in 1738. The family produced several noted mathematicians.
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vernier (n.)
device for making precise measurements, 1766, from name of inventor, French mathematician Pierre Vernier (1580-1637), who described it in 1631.
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Archimedean (adj.)
1798, "of or pertaining to Archimedes" (Latinized from Greek Arkhimedes), celebrated practical mathematician of antiquity, born in Syracuse 3c. B.C.E. Archimedean screw is from 1806.
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Leibnitz 
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz (also Leibniz), 1646-1716, German philosopher and mathematician, independent inventor (Newton was the other) of differential and integral calculus.
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gauss 
C.G.S. unit of intensity of a magnetic field, 1882, named for German mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Related: Gaussage; gaussian.
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Boolean (adj.)
in reference to abstract algebraic systems, 1851, Boolian, so called for George Boole (1815-1864), English mathematician. The surname is a variant of Bull.
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Turing machine (n.)
1937, named for English mathematician and computer pioneer Alan M. Turing (1912-1954), who described such a device in 1936.
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Fibonacci (adj.)
1891 in reference to a series of numbers in which each is equal to the sum of the preceding two, from name of Leonardo Fibonacci (fl. c. 1200) Tuscan mathematician.
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