Etymology
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mastication (n.)

"the action of chewing," early 15c., masticacioun, from Old French masticacion and directly from Latin masticationem (nominative masticatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of masticare "to chew" (source of Old French maschier, French mâcher), which is probably from a Greek source related to mastikhan "to gnash the teeth," from PIE *mendh- "to chew" (see mandible), though Beekes suggests the group may be of Pre-Greek origin.

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masticate (v.)

"to chew (food)," 1640s, back-formation from mastication, or else from Late Latin masticatus, past participle of masticare "to chew." Related: Masticated; masticating.

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papier-mache (n.)

also papier mache, material prepared from paper pulped to a doughy consistence, 1753, from French papier-mâché, literally "chewed paper," from Old French papier "paper" (see paper (n.)) + mâché "compressed, mashed," from past participle of mâcher, literally "to chew," from Late Latin masticare "to chew" (see mastication).

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mastic (n.)

gum or resin obtained from certain small trees of the Mediterranean region, late 14c., mastik, from Old French mastic (13c.) and directly from Late Latin mastichum, from Latin mastiche, from Greek mastikhe, a word of uncertain origin, probably related to masasthai "to chew" (see mastication). The substance is used as a chewing gum in the East.

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fletcherism (n.)
dietary system emphasizing very thorough mastication, 1903, from -ism + name of Horace Fletcher (1849-1919), U.S. health enthusiast. Related: Fletcherize; fletcherized.
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