Etymology
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mastic (n.)

gum or resin obtained from certain small trees of the Mediterranean region, late 14c., mastik, from Old French mastic (13c.) and directly from Late Latin mastichum, from Latin mastiche, from Greek mastikhe, a word of uncertain origin, probably related to masasthai "to chew" (see mastication). The substance is used as a chewing gum in the East.

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Spackle (n.)
proprietary name for a surfacing compound, 1927, probably based on German spachtel "putty knife, mastic, filler." The verb is attested from 1940. Related: Spackled; spackling.
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asafetida (n.)
"pungent sap from the roots of several plants native to Persia and Afghanistan," used as a drug, late 14c., from Medieval Latin asa (Latinized from Persian aza "mastic") + foetida, fem. of foetidus "stinking" (see fetid).
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cud (n.)

"portion of food voluntarily forced into the mouth by the stomach of a ruminating animal," Old English cudu "cud," also "gum, resin, mastic," earlier cwudu, from Proto-Germanic *kweduz "resin" (source also of Old Norse kvaða "resin," Old High German quiti "glue," German Kitt "putty").

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masticable (adj.)

"capable of being chewed, that may be masticated," 1802; see masticate + -able.

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masticate (v.)

"to chew (food)," 1640s, back-formation from mastication, or else from Late Latin masticatus, past participle of masticare "to chew." Related: Masticated; masticating.

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mastication (n.)

"the action of chewing," early 15c., masticacioun, from Old French masticacion and directly from Latin masticationem (nominative masticatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of masticare "to chew" (source of Old French maschier, French mâcher), which is probably from a Greek source related to mastikhan "to gnash the teeth," from PIE *mendh- "to chew" (see mandible), though Beekes suggests the group may be of Pre-Greek origin.

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