Etymology
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masses (n.)
"people of the lower class," 1836; plural of mass (n.1).
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plasmodium (n.)

"protoplasm of protozoans in sheets, masses, or large quantities," 1871, Modern Latin, coined 1863 in Germany from plasma + -odium, from Greek -oeidēs "like" (see -oid). The classical plural is plasmodia.

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pitchblende (n.)

also pitch-blende, oxide of uranium, usually occurring in pitchy black masses, 1770, a loan-translation of German Pechblende; see pitch (n.2) + blende.

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flocculate (v.)
"gather in flocculent masses," 1845 (flocculated), from flocculus (1799), from Modern Latin, a diminutive of Latin floccus "tuft of wool," a word of unknown origin, + -ate (2). Related: Flocculating.
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mass (v.)

late 14c., transitive, "to form into a mass" (implied in y-maced), from mass (n.1) or from French masser. Intransitive sense of "to gather in a mass, collect in masses" is by 1560s. Related: Massed; massing.

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panem et circenses 

Latin, literally "bread and circuses," supposedly coined by Juvenal and describing the cynical formula of the Roman emperors for keeping the masses content with ample food and entertainment.

Duas tantum res anxius optat, Panem et circenses [Juvenal, Sat. x.80].
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meteorite (n.)

"rock or metallic mass of extraterrestrial origin that falls to earth after streaking across the sky as a meteor," 1818, from meteor + -ite. They were known from ancient times, but the idea that some such iron masses or rocks had fallen to earth from the sky attained credence among scientists c. 1800.

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rubble (n.)

"rough, irregular stones broken from larger masses," especially "waste fragments from the demolition of a building, etc.," late 14c., robeyl, from Anglo-French *robel "bits of broken stone," which is of obscure origin, apparently related to rubbish "waste fragments" [OED], but also possibly from Old French robe (see rob). Middle English Compendium compares Anglo-Latin rubisum, robusium.

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continent (n.)
Origin and meaning of continent

1550s, "continuous tract of land," from continent land (mid-15c.), translating Medieval Latin terra continens "continuous land," from Latin continens "continuous," present participle of continere "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").

As "one of the large land masses of the globe" from 1610s. As "the mainland of Europe" (from the point of view of Britain), from c. 1600.

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staphylococcus (n.)
(plural staphylococci), 1887, Modern Latin, the genus name, coined (on model of streptococcus) in 1882 by Scottish surgeon and bacteriologist Alexander Ogston (1844-1929). The first element is from Greek staphyle "bunch of grapes," which possibly is from PIE *stabh-, variant of *stebh- "post, stem; to support" (see staff (n.)). The second element is Modern Latin coccus "spherical bacterium," from Greek kokkos "berry, grain" (see cocco-). So called because the bacteria usually bunch together in irregular masses.
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