Etymology
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mason (n.)

c. 1200 (early 12c. as a surname), masoun, "stoneworker, builder in stone, one who dresses, lays, or carves stone," from Old French masson, maçon "stone mason" (Old North French machun), probaby from Frankish *makjo or some other Germanic source (compare Old High German steinmezzo "stone mason," Modern German Steinmetz, with second element related to mahhon "to make"); from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit."

But it also might be from, or influenced by, Medieval Latin machio, matio (7c.) which is said by Isidore to be derived from machina (see machine (n.)). The medieval word also might be from the root of Latin maceria "wall." Meaning "a member of the fraternity of freemasons" is attested from early 15c. in Anglo-French. The Mason jar (by 1868), a type of molded glass jar with an airtight screw lid, used for home preserves, is named for John L. Mason of New York, who patented it in 1858. 

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Anti-Mason (n.)
by 1928 in reference to a U.S. third political party formed in opposition to elites and for a time powerful in the mid-Atlantic states, from anti- + Mason, in reference to the secret society. Related: Anti-Masonic.
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masonic (adj.)

1767, "of or pertaining to the fraternity of freemasons;" 1810, "of or pertaining to stone masons;" see mason + -ic.

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masonry (n.)

mid-14c., masonrie, "stonework, a construction of dressed or fitted stones;" late 14c., "art or occupation of a mason;" from Old French maçonerie (14c.), from maçon (see mason).

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stonemason (n.)
1733, from stone (n.) + mason. Another name for the profession was hard-hewer (15c.). Stone-cutter is from 1530s; Old English had stanwyrhta "stone-wright."
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Mason-Dixon Line 

by 1779, named for Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, English astronomers who surveyed (1763-7) the disputed boundary between the colonial holdings of the Penns (Pennsylvania) and the Calverts (Maryland). It became the technical boundary between "free" and "slave" states after 1804, when the last slaveholding state above it (New Jersey) passed its abolition act. As the line between "the North" and "the South" in U.S. culture, it is attested by 1834.

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*mag- 
also *mak-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to knead, fashion, fit." It forms all or part of: amass; among; macerate; magma; make; mason; mass (n.1) "lump, quantity, size;" match (n.2) "one of a pair, an equal;" mingle; mongrel.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek magis "kneaded mass, cake," mageus "one who kneads, baker;" Latin macerare "soften, make soft, soak, steep;" Lithuanian minkyti "to knead;" Old Church Slavonic mazo "to anoint, smear;" Breton meza "to knead;" Old English macian "to make, form, construct, do," German machen "to make;" Middle Irish maistir "to churn."
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Masonite 

1926, proprietary name of a type of fiberboard, by Mason Fibre Company, Laurel, Mississippi, U.S., and named for  William H. Mason (1877-1940), protege of Edison, who patented the process of making it. Earlier (1840) as a word in mineralogy for a type of chloritoid; the name honors Owen Mason of Providence, R.I., a collector who first brought the mineral to the attention of geologists.

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Suzie 
also Susie, familiar form of fem. proper name Susan, Susanna. Suzie Wong is in reference to "The World of Suzie Wong," 1957 novel by R.L. Mason featuring a Hong Kong prostitute. Susie Q as the name of a popular dance is from 1936.
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lithodomous (adj.)
"dwelling in rocks," 1835, from French lithodomus, lithodomes "shellfish which lives in a hole in a rock" (1820s, Cuvier), from litho- "rock" + Greek domos "house" (see domestic (adj.)). Greek lithodomos meant "a mason," from demein "to build," which is derived from domos.
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