Etymology
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Mariolatry (n.)

"worship of the Virgin Mary," usually implying idolatrous or improper veneration, 1610s, from Mary + -latry "worship of," with connective element -o-. Related: Mariolater; Mariolatrous.

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marionette (n.)

"a puppet worked by strings," c. 1620, literally "little little Mary," from French marionette (16c.), diminutive of Old French mariole "figurine, idol, picture of the Virgin Mary," itself a diminutive of Marie (see Mary). For ending, see -ette.

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marry (interj.)

now obsolete, but a common oath in the Middle Ages and after, mid-14c., a corruption of the name of the Virgin Mary. It could mean "indeed, forsooth," be a term of asseveration, or be used to express surprise or any other feeling.

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Marian (adj.)

"of Mary," 1701, referring to the Virgin, from Mary + -ian; also (c. 1600) in reference to the reign of Queen Mary of England, who reigned 1553-58; and (1902) to Mary Queen of Scots (1542-1587). Also "of or pertaining to Caius Marius," the noted Roman general (died 86 B.C.E.).

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marigold (n.)

popular name of several plants with golden or bright yellow flowers, late 14c., marygolde, from Mary (probably a reference to the Virgin) + gold, for color. The Old English name for the flower was simply golde. Compare Dutch goudbloom, German Goldblume. As a color name, by 1770.

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typhoid (adj.)
1800, literally "resembling typhus," from typhus + -oid. The noun is from 1861, a shortened form of typhoid fever (1845), so called because it originally was thought to be a variety of typhus. Typhoid Mary (1909) was Mary Mallon (d.1938), a typhoid carrier who worked as a cook and became notorious after it was learned she unwittingly had infected hundreds in U.S.
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supercalifragilisticexpialidocious 
from song in 1964 Disney movie version of "Mary Poppins;" subject of a lawsuit based on earlier song title "Supercalafajalistickexpialadojus" (1949), but other versions of the word also were in circulation.
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bain-marie (n.)

"shallow, flat vessel containing hot water in which another vessel is placed to heat its contents gently," by 1733 (in a cookery book, earlier, 1724 as the name of a meat dish cooked in one), from French bain-marie, from Medieval Latin balneum Mariae, literally "bath of Mary."

According to French sources, perhaps so called for the gentleness of its heating; others credit the name to the supposed inventor, Mary the Jewess, mentioned in early gnostic writings and looked on since 4c. C.E. as a founder of alchemy. Middle English had balne of mary (late 15c.). French bain was used by itself in English in various sense 15c.-17c.; it is from baigner "to bathe" (12c.), from Latin balneare, from balneum "bath" (see balneal).

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Candlemas (n.)
Church festival, late Old English candelmæsse (from candle + mass (n.2)), feast of the purification of the Virgin Mary (Feb. 2), celebrated with many candles, corresponding to Celtic pagan Imbolc.
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marrowbone (n.)

late 14c., marybones (late 13c. as a surname), "bone containing fat or marrow," from marrow + bone (n.). A poetic Old English word for "bone" was mearhcofa "marrow-chamber." Later generally of any large bone. The conjecture that it is a corruption of Mary-bones, in allusion to the reverence paid to the Virgin Mary by kneeling "is absurd" [Century Dictionary]; nonetheless, marrowbones is used especially to mean "the bones of the knees" (1530s). To ride in the marrow-bone coach was one of many terms in old slang for "to go on foot."

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