Etymology
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maritime (adj.)

1540s, "of or pertaining to the sea," from French maritime (16c.) or directly from Latin maritimus "of the sea, near the sea," from mare (genitive maris) "sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water") + Latin ending -timus, originally a superlative suffix (compare intimus "inmost," ultimus "last"), here denoting "close association with." Maritimes "seacoast regions of a country" is from 1590s; specifically of the southeasternmost provinces of Canada adjoining the Atlantic Ocean by 1921.

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*mori- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "body of water."

It forms all or part of: aquamarine; Armorica; beche-de-mer; cormorant; mare (n.2) "broad, dark areas of the moon;" marina; marinate; marine; mariner; maritime; marsh; mere (n.1) "lake, pool;" Merlin; mermaid; merman; meerschaum; meerkat; morass; Muriel; rosemary; submarine; ultramarine; Weimar.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin mare; Old Church Slavonic morje, Russian more, Lithuanian marės, Old Irish muir, Welsh mor "sea;" Old English mere "sea, ocean; lake, pool," German Meer "sea."

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portreeve (n.)

"chief magistrate of a port or maritime town," Old English portgerefa; see port (n.1) + reeve (n.).

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trucial (adj.)
1876, from truce + -ial. Trucial States, the pre-1971 name of the United Arab Emirates, is attested from 1891, in reference to the 1835 maritime truce between Britain and the Arab sheiks of Oman.
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marine (adj.)

mid-15c., "found in or pertaining to the sea," from Old French marin "of the sea, maritime," and directly from Latin marinus "of the sea," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." The Old English word was sælic.

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Nova Scotia 

maritime province of Canada, Latin, literally "New Scotland," part of the former French Acadia, it was so named when a settlement grant was made by James I to William Alexander, Earl of Sterling, in 1621. Related: Nova Scotian.

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marina (n.)
1805, "a promenade by the sea," from Spanish or Italian marina "shore, coast," from Latin marinus "of the sea, maritime," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." Meaning "dock or basin with moorings for yachts and small craft" is 1935, American English.
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Attica 
"region around Athens," traditionally explained as from Greek Attikos (Latin Atticus) "of Athens" (see Athens), which is supported by Beekes. An alternative guess is that it is ultimately from Greek akte "shore, maritime place," also "raised place."
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argosy (n.)
1570s, "large merchant vessel carrying rich freight," from Italian (nave) Ragusea "(vessel) of Ragusa," maritime city on the Dalmatian coast of the Adriatic (modern Dubrovnik in Croatia). Their large merchant ships brought rich Eastern goods to 16c. England. The city name sometimes was Aragouse or Arragosa in 16c. English. Figurative use from 1620s.
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Corregidor 

island at the entrance to Manila Bay in the Philippines, fortified 18c. by the Spanish, it was the place where the maritime registrar recorded the particulars of ships entering the bay, hence the name, from Spanish corregidor "chief magistrate of a town," etymologically "correcter," from Latin corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)).

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