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margin (v.)

c. 1600, "to furnish with marginal notes," from margin (n.). From 1715 as "to furnish with a margin." Related: Margined.

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margin (n.)

mid-14c., "edge of a sea or lake;" late 14c., of a written or printed paper, "space between a block of text and the edge of a leaf or sheet;" from Old French margin and directly from Latin marginem (nominative margo) "edge, brink, border, margin," from PIE root *merg- "boundary, border."

The general sense of "bordering space, boundary space, rim or edge" is from late 14c. Meaning "comfort allowance, cushion, scope, range, provision for enlarged or extended action" is by 1851; margin of error is attested by 1889. Stock market sense of "sum deposited with a broker to cover risk of loss" is from 1848. Related: Margins.

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marge (n.)

"edge, border," 1550s, now chiefly poetic, shortening of margin (n.), or from French marge.

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marginalia (n.)

"marginal notes," 1832, from Latin marginalia, neuter plural of adjective marginalis "marginal," from marginis (see margin (n.)).

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marginal (adj.)

1570s, "written or printed on the margin of a page," from Medieval Latin marginalis, from Latin margo "edge, brink, border, margin" (see margin (n.)). Sense of "of little effect or importance" first recorded 1887. Related: Marginally.

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*merg- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "boundary, border."

It forms all or part of: Cymric; demarcation; Denmark; emarginate; landmark; march (v.) "walk with regular tread;" march (n.2) "boundary;" marchioness; margin; margrave; mark (n.1) "trace, impression;" mark (n.2) "unit of money or weight;" marque; marquee; marquetry; marquis; remark; remarkable.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin margo "margin;" Avestan mareza- "border;" Old Irish mruig, Irish bruig "borderland," Welsh bro "district;" Old English mearc "boundary, sign, limit, mark," Gothic marka "boundary, frontier."
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emarginate (adj.)

"having the margin or extremity notched," 1731 (implied in emarginated), from Latin emarginatus, past participle of emarginare, from assimilated form of ex- (see ex-) + margo "edge, brink, border, margin" (from PIE root *merg- "boundary, border"). Related: Emargination.

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river-bottom (n.)

"alluvial land along the margin of a river," 1752, American English, from river (n.) + bottom (n.).

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indent (n.)

"cut or notch in a margin," 1590s, from indent (v.1). A supposed earlier noun sense of "a written agreement" (late 15c.) is described in The Middle English Compendium as "scribal abbrev. of endenture."

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brim (n.)
"brink, edge, margin," c. 1200, brymme "edge (of the sea), bank (of a river)," of obscure origin, perhaps akin to Old Norse barmr "rim, brim," probably related to dialectal German bräme "margin, border, fringe," from PIE *bhrem- "point, spike, edge." Extended by 1520s to the upper or projecting edge of anything hollow (cups, basins, hats).

Old English (and northern Middle English) had brim "sea, surf, pool, spring, river, body of water," of uncertain origin but probably unrelated, perhaps from the Germanic stem *brem- "to roar, rage." "It became obs. in ME.; but was perhaps used by Spenser" [OED].
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