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manifestation (n.)

early 15c., manifestacioun, "action of disclosing what is secret, obscure, or unseen; exhibition, demonstration," from Late Latin manifestationem (nominative manifestatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin manifestare "to discover, disclose, betray" (see manifest (adj.)). Meaning "an object, action, or presence by which something is made manifest" is from 1785. The spiritualism sense of "phenomena by which the presence of a spirit or ghost is supposed to be rendered perceptible" is attested by 1853.

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besot (v.)
"affect with a foolish manifestation," 1570s, from be- + sot. Related: Besotted; besotting.
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epiphany (n.)

early 14c., "festival of the manifestation of Christ to the gentiles" (celebrated Jan. 6; usually with a capital -E-), from Old French epiphanie, from Late Latin epiphania, neuter plural (taken as feminine singular), from late Greek epiphaneia "manifestation, striking appearance, festival held in commemoration of the appearance of a god at some particular place" (in New Testament, "advent or manifestation of Christ"), from epiphanes "manifest, conspicuous," from epiphainein "to manifest, display, show off; come suddenly into view," from epi "on, to" (see epi-) + phainein "to show" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine"). Of divine beings other than Christ, first recorded 1660s; general literary sense of "any manifestation or revelation" appeared 1840, first in De Quincey.

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embodiment (n.)

"investment in or manifestation through a physical body; a bringing into or presentation in or through a form," 1824, from embody + -ment.

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manifest (n.)

"certified list of a ship's cargo," for use by Customs, 1706; see manifest (adj.). Earlier, "a public declaration" (1610s; compare manifesto), from French manifeste, verbal noun from manifester. Earlier still in English as "a manifestation" (1560s).

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gratulation (n.)

late 15c., gratulacyon "expression of thanks," from Latin gratulationem (nominative gratulatio) "a manifestation of joy, wishing joy, rejoicing," from past-participle stem of gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

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outbreak (n.)

"eruption, a sudden and violent manifestation" (of disease, hostilities, etc.), c. 1600, from the verbal phrase; see out (adv.) + break (v.). Outbreak (v.) "to break out, escape confinement" (c. 1300) was still in poetic use in 19c.

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opening (n.)

Old English openung "act of making open" (a door, mouth, etc.), "disclosure, manifestation," verbal noun from present participle of open (v.). Meaning "vacant space, hole, aperture, doorway" is attested from c. 1200. Meaning "act of opening (a place, to the public)" is from late 14c.  Sense of "opportunity, chance" is from 1793. Sense of "action of beginning (something)" is from 1712; meaning "first performance of a play" is 1855; that of "start of an art exhibit" is from 1905. Opening night is attested from 1814.

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tiffany (n.)

"type of thin, transparent fabric," c. 1600; earlier a common name for the festival of the Epiphany (early 14c.; in Anglo-French from late 13c.), from Old French Tifinie, Tiphanie "Epiphany" (c. 1200), from Late Latin Theophania "Theophany," another name for the Epiphany, from Greek theophania "the manifestation of a god" (see theophany).

Also popular in Old French and Middle English as a name given to girls born on Epiphany Day. The fabric sense is found only in English and is of obscure origin and uncertain relation to the other meanings, unless "holiday silk" or as a fanciful or playful allusion to "manifestation:"

The invention of that fine silke, Tiffanie, Sarcenet, and Cypres, which instead of apparell to cover and hide, shew women naked through them. [Holland's "Pliny," 1601]

The fashionable N.Y. jewelry firm Tiffany & Co. (1895) is named for its founder, goldsmith Charles L. Tiffany (1812-1902) and his son, Louis C. Tiffany (1848-1933), who was the art nouveau decorator noted for his glassware. The surname is attested in English from 1206.

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muster (n.)

late 14c., moustre, "action of showing, demonstration, manifestation, exhibition" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French mostre "illustration, proof; examination, inspection" (13c., Modern French montre), literally "that which is shown," from mostrer "appear, show, reveal" (see muster (v.)). Meaning "an assembly or act of gathering troops" is from c. 1400. Meaning "a register or roll of troops mustered" is from 1560s. To pass muster "undergo review without censure" is by 1620s; in the form pass the musters it is attested from 1570s.

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