Etymology
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manic (adj.)

"pertaining to or affected with mania," 1902, from mania + -ic. The clinical term manic depressive also is from 1902; manic depression is first attested 1903. An older name for it was circular insanity (1857), from French folie circulaire (1854).

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*men- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to think," with derivatives referring to qualities and states of mind or thought.

It forms all or part of: admonish; Ahura Mazda; ament; amentia; amnesia; amnesty; anamnesis; anamnestic; automatic; automaton; balletomane; comment; compos mentis; dement; demonstrate; Eumenides; idiomatic; maenad; -mancy; mandarin; mania; maniac; manic; mantic; mantis; mantra; memento; mens rea; mental; mention; mentor; mind; Minerva; minnesinger; mnemonic; Mnemosyne; money; monition; monitor; monster; monument; mosaic; Muse; museum; music; muster; premonition; reminiscence; reminiscent; summon.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit manas- "mind, spirit," matih "thought," munih "sage, seer;" Avestan manah- "mind, spirit;" Greek memona "I yearn," mania "madness," mantis "one who divines, prophet, seer;" Latin mens "mind, understanding, reason," memini "I remember," mentio "remembrance;" Lithuanian mintis "thought, idea," Old Church Slavonic mineti "to believe, think," Russian pamjat "memory;" Gothic gamunds, Old English gemynd "memory, remembrance; conscious mind, intellect."

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hypomania (n.)
"manic elation accompanied by quickened perception," 1843 (as a clinical word from 1882, from German hypomanie, 1881); see hypo- "under, beneath" + mania. Related: Hypomaniac; hypomanic.
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bipolar (adj.)
"having two poles;" see bi- "two" + polar. From 1810 in figurative sense of "of double aspect;" 1859 with reference to anatomy ("having two processes from opposite poles," of nerve cells). Psychiatric use in reference to what had been called manic-depressive psychosis is said to have begun 1957 with German psychiatrist Karl Leonhard. The term became popular early 1990s. Bipolar disorder was in DSM III (1980).
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crazy (adj.)

1570s, "diseased, sickly" (a sense now obsolete); 1580s, "broken, impaired, full of cracks or flaws," from craze + -y (2). Meaning "deranged, demented, of unsound mind or behaving as so" is from 1610s. Jazz slang sense "cool, exciting" is attested by 1927. Related: Crazily; craziness.

To drive (someone) crazy is attested by 1873. To do something like crazy "with manic vigor or frequency" is by 1905. Phrase crazy like a fox has origins by 1935. Crazy Horse, name of the Teton Lakhota (Siouan) war leader (d. 1877), translates thašuka witko, literally "his horse is crazy." Crazy-quilt (1886) preserves the original "break to pieces" sense of craze (v.). Crazy bone as an alternative to funny bone is recorded by 1853.

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Manichaean 

also Manichean, 1550s (n.) "an adherent of the religious system taught by Manichaeus;" 1630s (adj.) "of or pertaining to the Manichaeans or their doctrines;" from Latin Manichaeus (see Manichaeism).

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manicure (v.)

"apply manicure treatment to, care for (the hands and fingernails)," 1885, from manicure (n.). Related: Manicured; manicuring.

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manicotti (n.)

in cookery, 1946, from Italian manicotti, said to mean literally "hand-warmers, muff," from Latin manicae "long sleeves of a tunic, gloves; armlets, gauntlets; handcuffs" (see manacle (n.)).

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manicure (n.)

1873, "one who professionally treats hands and fingernails," from French manicure, literally "the care of the hands and fingernails," from Latin manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + cura "care" (see cure (n.1)). Meaning "treatment and care of the hands and fingernails" is attested by 1887.

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manicurist (n.)

"one whose profession is to give manicure treatments, one who makes a business of trimming and polishing the nails, removing blemishes from the hands, etc.," 1884, from manicure (n.) + -ist.

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