Etymology
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mania (n.)

late 14c., "mental derangement characterized by excitement and delusion," from Late Latin mania "insanity, madness," from Greek mania "madness, frenzy; enthusiasm, inspired frenzy; mad passion, fury," related to mainesthai "to rage, go mad," mantis "seer," menos "passion, spirit," all of uncertain origin, perhaps from PIE *mnyo-, suffixed form of root *men- (1) "to think," with derivatives referring to qualities and states of mind or thought.

Mania is manifested by psychic elevation, increased motor activity, rapid speech and the quick flight of ideas. [Scientific American, September 1973]

Sense of "fad, craze, enthusiasm resembling mania, eager or uncontrollable desire" is by 1680s, from French manie in this sense. Sometimes nativized in Middle English as manye. Used since 1500s as the second element in compounds expressing particular types of madness (such as nymphomania, 1775; kleptomania, 1830; megalomania, 1890), originally in Medical Latin, in imitation of Greek, which had a few such compounds, mostly post-classical: gynaikomania (women), hippomania (horses), etc.

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bibliomania (n.)
"book-madness, a rage for collecting rare or unusual books," 1734, after French bibliomanie, from biblio- "book" + mania.
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narcomania (n.)

"uncontrollable craving for narcotic drugs," 1887, from narco- + mania.

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graphomania (n.)
"morbid desire for writing," 1811, from Greek graphein "to write" (see -graphy) + mania. Related: Graphomaniac.
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phonomania (n.)

"mania for murder or killing," 1842, from Greek phonē, phonos "slaughter, bloodshed, killing" + mania.

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erotomania (n.)
1813, defined then as "Desperate love; sentimentalism producing morbid feelings," from combining form of erotic + mania.
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logomaniac (n.)

"one mad for words," 1870; see logo- "word" + maniac (see mania).

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Anglomania (n.)
"excessive or undue enthusiasm for England and all things English," 1787 (Jefferson); see Anglo- + mania. Related: Anglomaniac.
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hypomania (n.)
"manic elation accompanied by quickened perception," 1843 (as a clinical word from 1882, from German hypomanie, 1881); see hypo- "under, beneath" + mania. Related: Hypomaniac; hypomanic.
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-mane 

word-forming element of French origin, "one who has a mania for," ultimately from Greek -manes "ardent admirer," related to mania "madness" (see mania).

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