Etymology
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mane (n.)

"growth of long hair on the back of the neck and shoulders," characteristic of the horse, lion, and some other animals, Old English manu "mane of a horse," from Proto-Germanic *mano (source also of Old Norse mön, Old Frisian mana, Middle Dutch mane, Dutch manen, Old High German mana, German Mähne "mane"), from PIE *mon- "neck, nape of the neck" (source also of Sanskrit manya "nape of the neck," Old English mene "necklace," Latin monile "necklace," Welsh mwng "mane," Old Church Slavonic monisto, Old Irish muin "neck"). The Scandinavian languages have the word in a diminutive form (Danish manke, Swedish manke). Extended use, of a person's hair, is from late 14c.

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balletomane (n.)

by 1930, from ballet + -mane "one who has a mania for," which is ultimately from Greek and related to mania "madness."

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manilla (2)

also manilio, "metal (usually copper) ring or arm-bracelet sold or bartered by European traders among African peoples," 1550s, from Spanish manilla, from Latin monilia, plural of monile "collar, necklace," from PIE *mon- "neck, nape of the neck" (source also of mane). Influenced in Spanish by Spanish mano "hand."

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jubate (adj.)
"having a mane," 1826, from Latin jubatus "maned," from juba "a mane, flowing hair on the neck of an animal," perhaps from a PIE root meaning "that moves" on the notion of "moving to and fro, shaking." This old guess has been rejected by some, "but since a better etymology is absent, we may accept it for the time being" [de Vaan].
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horsehair (n.)
late 14c., from horse (n.) + hair (n.). Specifically the hair of the mane and tail, used for making haircloth and stuffing cushions, etc.
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crisp (v.)

late 14c., "to curl, to twist into short, stiff waves or ringlets" (of the hair, beard, mane, etc.) from crisp (adj.) or else from Old French crespir, Latin crispare, from the adjectives. Meaning "to become brittle" is from 1805. Related: Crisped; crisping; crispation.

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hog (v.)
"to appropriate greedily," 1884, U.S. slang (first attested in "Huck Finn"), from hog (n.). Earlier it meant "Cause to form a horizontal arch" (like the back of a hog), 1798, and "cut a horse's mane short" (so it bristles like a hog's back), 1769. Related: Hogged; hogging.
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manana 

from Spanish mañana, "tomorrow," from cras manñana, literally "tomorrow early," from Vulgar Latin *maneana "early," from Latin mane "in the morning," from PIE *ma- "good," with notion of "occurring at a good time, timely, early" (compare matins; and see mature (v.)). "Often taken as a synonym of easy-going procrastination said to be found in Spanish-speaking countries" [OED].

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palomino (n.)

"horse with a light brown or cream coat and a pale mane and tail," 1899, (earlier palomino horse), from American Spanish palomino "cream-colored horse," from Spanish, literally "young dove," perhaps from Italian palombino "dove-colored," from Latin palumbinus "of wood pigeons," from palumba "wood pigeon" (from PIE root *pel- (1) "pale"). The type of horse was so called because of its dove-like coloring.

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mature (v.)

c. 1400, maturen, "encourage suppuration;" mid-15c., of plants, "cause to ripen, bring to maturity," from Latin mātūrare "to ripen, bring to maturity," from mātūrus "ripe, timely, early," related to māne "early, of the morning," from PIE *meh-tu- "ripeness." De Vaan writes that "The root is probably the same as in mānus 'good'." Intransitive sense of "come to a state of ripeness, become ripe or perfect" is from 1650s. The financial sense of "reach the time for payment" is by 1861. Related: Matured; maturing.

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