Etymology
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manager (n.)

1580s, "one who directs or controls," agent noun from manage. Specific sense of "one charged with conducting a house of business or public institution" is from 1705.

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managerial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to managers or management; characteristic of a manager," 1767, see manager + -ial.

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managery (n.)

"domestic administration, the act of managing (a farm or crop)," a word now obsolete, 1630s, from manager + -y (4); or perhaps from manage + -ery.

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procurator (n.)

c. 1300, procuratour, "steward or manager of a household;" also "a provider" (late 13c. as a surname), from Old French procuratour "attorney, agent, proxy, spokesman" (13c., Modern French procurateur) and directly from Latin procurator "manager, overseer, agent, deputy," agent noun from past-participle stem of procurare "to manage, take care of" (see procure). Related: Procuracy; procuration; procuratory; procuratorial.

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economist (n.)

1580s, "household manager," from French économiste; see economy + -ist. Meaning "student of political economy" is from 1804.

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entrepreneur (n.)
1828, "manager or promoter of a theatrical production," reborrowing of French entrepreneur "one who undertakes or manages," agent noun from Old French entreprendre "undertake" (see enterprise). The word first crossed the Channel late 15c. (Middle English entreprenour) but did not stay. Meaning "business manager" is from 1852. Related: Entrepreneurship.
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proctor (n.)

"one employed to manage the affairs of another," late 14c., contraction of procurator (c. 1300) "steward or manager of a household;" also "a provider" (see procurator). From late 14c. as "one who acts or speaks for another; spokesman, advocate;" early 15c. as "business manager or financial administrator of a church, college, holy order, etc." Related: Proctorial; proctorship.

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boss (v.1)
"be master or manager of, to order and direct as a boss," 1856, from boss (n.1). Related: Bossed; bossing.
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wharfinger (n.)
"operator or manager of a wharf," 1550s, from wharfage "provision or accommodation at wharves" (mid-15c.), from wharf + agent noun suffix -er (1) + unetymological -n- as in messenger.
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maitre d'hotel 

1530s, "head domestic, master or superintendent of the table in a mansion," from French maître d'hôtel, literally "house-master," from Old French maistre "master; skilled worker, educator" (12c.), from Latin magistrum (see magistrate). Sense of "hotel manager, manager of a dining room" is from 1890. Shortened form maître d' is attested from 1942; simple maitre in this sense is from 1899.

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