Etymology
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manage (v.)
Origin and meaning of manage

1560s, "to handle, train, or direct" (a horse), from the now-obsolete noun manage "the handling or training of a horse; horsemanship" (see manege, which is a modern revival of it), from Old French manège "horsemanship," from Italian maneggio, from maneggiare "to handle, touch," especially "to control a horse," which ultimately from Latin noun manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand").

Extended sense of "control or direct by administrative ability" any sort of business is by 1570s; meaning "to wield (a tool or object) by hand" is from 1580s. Meaning "effect by effort" (hence "succeed in accomplishing") is by 1732. Intransitive sense of "get by, carry on affairs" is suggested by 1650s, in frequent use from mid-19c. Related: Managed; managing. Managed economy was used by 1933.

Manage literally implies handling, and hence primarily belongs to smaller concerns, on which one may at all times keep his hand: as, to manage a house; to manage a theater. Its essential idea is that of constant attention to details: as, only a combination of great abilities with a genius for industry can manage the affairs of an empire. [Century Dictionary]
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unmanaged (adj.)
c. 1600, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of manage (v.).
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manageable (adj.)

1590s, "capable of being handled or manipulated;" c. 1600, "capability of being governed or controlled," from manage + -able. Related: Manageably.

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mismanage (v.)

"manage badly, conduct carelessly or improperly," 1680s, from mis- (1) + manage. Related: Mismanaged; mismanaging.

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managery (n.)

"domestic administration, the act of managing (a farm or crop)," a word now obsolete, 1630s, from manager + -y (4); or perhaps from manage + -ery.

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manager (n.)

1580s, "one who directs or controls," agent noun from manage. Specific sense of "one charged with conducting a house of business or public institution" is from 1705.

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management (n.)

1590s, "act of managing by direction or manipulation," from manage + -ment. Sense of "act of man aging by physical manipulation" is from 1670s. Meaning "governing body, directors of an undertaking collectively" (originally of a theater) is from 1739.

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micromanage (v.)

"closely control and supervise the work of a subordinate, etc.; pay excessive attention to details in managing," by 1978, from micro- + manage (v.). Related: Micromanagement; micromanaged; micromanaging.

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manege (n.)

1640s, "riding school, a school for training horses and teaching horsemanship;" by 1776, "the art of horsemanship, movements proper to a trained horse," from French manège, from Italian maneggio "the handling or training of a horse," from maneggiare "to control (a horse);" see manage (v.).

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*man- (2)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "hand."

It forms all or part of: amanuensis; command; commando; commend; countermand; demand; Edmund; emancipate; legerdemain; maintain; manacle; manage; manciple; mandamus; mandate; manege; maneuver; manicure; manifest; manipulation; manner; manque; mansuetude; manual; manubrium; manufacture; manumission; manumit; manure; manuscript; mastiff; Maundy Thursday; mortmain; Raymond; recommend; remand; Sigismund.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite maniiahh- "to distribute, entrust;" Greek mane "hand," Latin manus "hand, strength, power over; armed force; handwriting," mandare "to order, commit to one's charge," literally "to give into one's hand;" Old Norse mund "hand," Old English mund "hand, protection, guardian," German Vormund "guardian;" Old Irish muin "protection, patronage."
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