Etymology
Advertisement
mama 

1707, spelling variant of mamma. Meaning "sexually attractive woman" is attested by 1925 in African-American vernacular. Mamasan "woman in a position of authority," especially "woman in charge of a geisha-house" is by 1949, with Japanese san, an honorific title. Mama mia! as an exclamation of surprise, etc. is by 1848, from Italian, literally "mother mine!"

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
grandma (n.)
1793, shortening of grandmama (1749), childish or familiar form of grandmother (see grand- + mama).
Related entries & more 
mumbo jumbo (n.)
1738, name of an idol supposedly worshipped by certain tribes in Africa; said to be a corruption of words in Mandingo (one reconstructed version is Mama Dyumbo), but no likely source has been found in the languages of the Niger region, to which the original accounts relate. Meaning "big, empty talk" is attested from 1896.
Related entries & more 
mamma (n.)

"mother," a word used especially by children and infants, 1570s, representing the native form of the reduplication of *ma- that is nearly universal among the Indo-European languages (Greek mamme "mother, grandmother," Latin mamma, Persian mama, Russian and Lithuanian mama "mother," German Muhme "mother's sister," French maman, Welsh mam "mother").

Probably a natural sound in baby-talk, perhaps imitative of sound made while sucking. Its late appearance in English is curious, but Middle English had mome (mid-13c.) "an aunt; an old woman," also an affectionate term of address for an older woman.

In educated usage, the stress is always on the last syllable. In terms of the recorded appearance of the variant or related words in English, mama is from 1707, mum is from 1823, mummy in this sense from 1839, mommy 1844, momma 1810, and mom 1867. Mamma's boy "soft, effeminate male" is by 1901. 

Related entries & more 
red-hot (adj.)

late 14c., "red with heat, heated till it glows red" (of metal, etc.); in reference to persons, "lively, passionate," it is recorded from c. 1600. Red-hot mama is 1926, jazz slang, "earthy female singer," also "girlfriend, lover."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Mammalia (n.)

"the class of Vertebrata containing all those animals which suckle their young and no other animals," 1773, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus, 1758), from neuter plural of Late Latin mammalis "of the breast," from mamma "breast," from PIE *mama and cognate with mamma. Also see -a (2)).

Related entries & more 
momma (n.)

1810, American English variant of mamma (q.v.). Apparently first used in the South and with a racial context. As a biker's girlfriend or female passenger, from 1950s.

An old negro woman is called momma, which is a broad pronunciation of mama ; and a girl, missy. I once happened to call a young negro wench momma"me be no momma," says she, "me had no children yet." [John Lambert, "Travels through Lower Canada, and the United States of North America in the Years 1806, 1807, and 1808," London, 1810]
Related entries & more