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malicious (adj.)

mid-13c., "harboring ill-will, enmity, or hostility," from Old French malicios "showing ill will, spiteful, wicked" (Modern French malicieux), from Latin malitiosus "wicked, malicious," from malitia "badness, ill will, spite," from malus "bad, unpleasant" (see mal-). In legal use (early 14c., Anglo-French), it means "characterized by malice prepense" (see malice).

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maliciously (adv.)

"in a spiteful manner, with enmity or ill-will," late 14c., from malicious + -ly (2).

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maliciousness (n.)

"extreme enmity or disposition to injure; actions prompted by hatred," mid-15c., from malicious + -ness.

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*mel- (3)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "false, bad, wrong." The exact sense of the root remains uncertain, "since it concerns a collection of largely isolated words in different IE branches" [de Vaan].

It forms all or part of: blame; blaspheme; blasphemous; blasphemy; ‌‌dismal; mal-; malady; malaise; malaria; malediction; malefactor; malefic; malevolence; malevolent; malice; malicious; malign; malison; malversation; mauvais.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Avestan mairiia‑, "treacherous;" Greek meleos "idle; unhappy;" Latin male (adv.) "badly," malus (adj.) "bad, evil;" Old Irish mell "destruction;" Armenian mel "sin;" Lithuanian melas "lie," Latvian malds "mistake," possbily also Greek blasphemein "to slander." 

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incendiarism (n.)
1670s; see incendiary + -ism. Originally figurative; the literal sense of "malicious burning" is attested from 1755.
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black-hearted (adj.)
"having a cruel or malicious heart," 1792, from black (adj.) + -hearted. Greek had the same image in melanokardios. Related: black-heartedly.
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incendiary (n.)
c. 1400, "person who sets malicious fires," from Latin incendiarius "an incendiary," literally "causing a fire" (see incendiary (adj.)). Meaning "person who enflames political passions" is from 1630s.
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mischievous (adj.)

early 14c., "unfortunate, disastrous, miserably, wretchedly," probably from mischief + -ous. Sense of "playfully malicious or annoying" is attested by 1670s. "The stressing on the second syllable was common in literature till about 1700; it is now dialectal, vulgar, and jocular" [OED]. Related: Mischievously; mischievousness.

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foe (n.)

Old English gefea, gefa "foe, enemy, adversary in a blood feud" (the prefix denotes "mutuality"), from adjective fah "at feud, hostile," also "guilty, criminal," from Proto-Germanic *faihaz (source also of Old High German fehan "to hate," Gothic faih "deception"), perhaps from the same PIE source that yielded Sanskrit pisunah "malicious," picacah "demon;" Lithuanian piktas "wicked, angry," peikti "to blame." Weaker sense of "adversary" is first recorded c. 1600.

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arson (n.)

"malicious burning of property," 1670s, from Anglo-French arsoun (late 13c.), Old French arsion, from Late Latin arsionem (nominative arsio) "a burning," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin ardere "to burn," from PIE root *as- "to burn, glow."  The Old English term was bærnet, literally "burning;" and Coke has indictment of burning (1640).

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