Etymology
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maledictory (adj.)

"pertaining to or containing a curse," 1660s, from Latin maledictus, from maledicere "to speak badly or evil of, slander" (from male "badly;" see mal- + dicere "to say," from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly") + -ory.

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malediction (n.)

mid-15c., malediccion, "a curse; condemnation, excommunication," from Old French maledicion "a curse" (15c.) and directly from Latin maledictionem (nominative maledictio) "the action of speaking evil of, slander," in Late Latin "a curse," noun of action from past participle stem of maledicere "to speak badly or evil of, slander," from male "badly" (see mal-) + dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). By 1530s as "evil-speaking, cursing, reviling."

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