Etymology
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Moro 
"Muslim Malay of the Philippines," 1886, from Spanish Moro, literally "Moor" (see Moor).
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sarong (n.)

skirt-like garment worn over the lower body by both sexes, the Malay national garment, 1834, from Malay (Austronesian) sarung "sheath, covering." OED traces it to "some mod. form of Skr. saranga 'variegated.' "

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gourami (n.)
type of freshwater fish, 1834, earlier in French, from Malay (Austronesian) gurami.
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gecko (n.)
1774, from Malay (Austronesian) gekoq, said to be imitative of its cry. Earlier forms in English were chacco (1711), jackoa (1727).
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cassowary (n.)
"large, flightless bird of Australia and Papua," 1610s, via French or Dutch, from Malay (Austronesian) kasuari.
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Timor 
island in the East Indies, Malay (Austronesian) timur "east" (in reference to Java and Sumatra). Related: Timorese.
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catecholamine (n.)

type of hormone, 1960, from catechol (1880), from catechu, 17c. name for an astringent substance used in medicines, dyeing, etc., which apparently is from Malay (Austronesian) kachu.

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batik (n.)
Javanese technique of textile design, 1880, from Dutch, from Malay (Austronesian) mbatik, said to be from amba "to write" + titik "dot, point."
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paddy (n.1)

1620s, "rice plant," from Malay (Austronesian) padi "rice in the straw." Main modern meaning "rice field, ground where rice is growing" (1948) is a shortening of paddy field.

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gutta-percha (n.)
1845, from Malay (Austronesian) getah percha, literally "the gum of percha," the name of the tree; the form of the word was influenced by Latin gutta "drop." As the name of the tree itself, from 1860.
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