Etymology
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maker (n.)

c. 1300, "one who creates, shapes, forms, or molds," also "God as creator," agent noun from make (v.). Specifically, "manufacturer" by late 14c. To meet (one's) maker "die" is attested by 1814.

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cabinet-maker (n.)
"one whose occupation is the making of household furniture," 1680s, from cabinet + maker.
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coach-maker (n.)

also coachmaker, "a maker of (horse-drawn) coaches," 1590s, from coach (n.) + maker.

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clock-maker (n.)

"one who makes clocks," mid-15c., from clock (n.1) + maker.

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widow-maker (n.)
"something lethally dangerous" (war, the sea, dangerous machinery, etc.), 1590s, from widow (n.) + maker.
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film-maker (n.)
also filmmaker, 1859 as a solution used in developing photographs, later "a producer of film for cameras" (by 1889), from film (n.) + maker. As "producer of a cinematographic work, movie-maker," from 1905.
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money-maker (n.)

late 13c, "one who coins money," from money + maker. Sense of "one who accumulates money" is by 1864; meaning "thing which yields profit" is from 1899. To make money "earn pay" is attested from mid-15c. Money-making (adj.) "lucrative, profitable" is from 1862.

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troublemaker (n.)
also trouble-maker, 1843, from trouble (n.) + maker.
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automaker (n.)
"manufacturer of automobiles," 1925, from auto "automobile" + maker.
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