Etymology
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Hoover 
proprietary name for a make of vacuum cleaner (patented 1927); sometimes used generally for "vacuum cleaner." As a verb, meaning "to vacuum," from 1926, in the company's advertising.
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Vespa (n.)
1950, proprietary name of an Italian make of motor scooter, first produced 1946, from Italian, literally "wasp," from Latin vespa (see wasp). Rival brand was Lambretta.
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Rolex (n.)

proprietary name of a make of watches, registered 1908 by German businessman Hans Wilsdorf, with Wilsdorf & Davis, London. Invented name. The company moved out of Britain 1912 for tax purposes and thence was headquartered in Geneva.

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Edsel 
notoriously unsuccessful make of car, introduced 1956 and named for Henry and Clara Ford's only child; figurative sense of "something useless and unwanted" is almost as old. Edsel is a family name, attested since 14c. (William de Egeshawe), from High Edser in Ewhurst, Surrey.
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Anastasia 
fem. proper name, from fem. of Late Latin Anastasius, from Greek Anastasios, from anastasis "resurrection, a raising up of the dead;" literally "a setting up, a standing or rising up," from ana "up; again" (see ana-) + histanai "to cause to stand, to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."
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Constantine 

masc. proper name, Latin Constantinus, from constans "standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful," present participle of constare "to stand together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." With the common name-forming suffix -inus (see -ine (1)).

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Chile 

South American country, probably named from a local native word subsequently confused with Mexican Spanish chile "chili pepper" (see chili). Suggestions are that the native word means "land's end" or else "cold, winter" which would make a coincidental convergence with English chilly. Related: Chilean. In 19c., often Chili, Chilian.

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Cathar (n.)

1570s, "religious puritan" (implied in Catharism), from Medieval Latin Cathari "the Pure," name taken by Novatians and other Christian sects, from New Testament Greek katharizein "to make clean," from Greek katharos "pure" (see catharsis). Especially in reference to the 12c. sects (Albigenses, etc.) in Languedoc and the Piedmont that denied the authority of Rome. Related: Catharist.

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Beatrice 
fem. proper name, from French Béatrice, from Latin beatrix, fem. of beatricem "who makes happy," from beatus "happy, blessed," past participle of beare "make happy, bless," which is possibly from PIE *dweye-, suffixed form of root *deu- (2) "to do, perform; show favor, revere." De Vaan finds the connection "semantically attractive, but the morphology is unclear."
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Dorcas 

fem. proper name, from Greek Dorkas, literally "gazelle, deer." Beekes writes that "it agrees with a Celtic word for 'roe', [Cornish] yorch, [Breton] iourc'h 'roe', [Middle Welsh] iwrch 'caprea mas', which points to IE *iorko-. " Dorcas Society "ladies' meeting to make clothes for the poor" (1832) is from Acts ix.36-41.

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