Etymology
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mainly (adv.)

c. 1300, "vigorously, strongly, forcibly" (a sense now obsolete), from main (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "especially, chiefly, principally" is from c. 1400; that of "for the most part" is from 1660s.

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wavelet (n.)
1808, mainly in poetry, from wave (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.
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tromp (v.)
1892, variant of tramp (v.); mainly American English. Related: Tromped; tromping.
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far-flung (adj.)
1828, mainly in poetry, from far (adv.) + past tense of fling (v.).
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enquire (v.)
alternative form of inquire, according to OED mainly used in sense of "to ask a question." Related: enquired; enquiring.
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employee (n.)
"person employed," 1850, mainly in U.S. use, from employ + -ee. Formed on model of French employé.
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fragmentary (adj.)
1610s, but mainly a dictionary word until early 19c., from fragment (n.) + -ary. Fragmental was used from 1798.
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principally (adv.)

mid-14c., principalli, "mostly, mainly; most importantly," from principal (adj.) + -ly (2). Late 14c. as "first of all." Meaning "for the most part" attested by 1832.

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con (n.1, adv.)

"negation; in the negative; the arguments, arguers, or voters against a proposal" (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)). Compare pro (n.2).

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afoul (adv.)
1809, originally nautical, "in a state of collision or entanglement," from a- (1) + foul (adj.). From 1833 in general sense of "in violent or hostile conflict," mainly in phrases such as run afoul of.
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