Etymology
Advertisement
Magus (n.)
member of the ancient Persian priestly caste, late 14c., singular of magi (q.v.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
simony (n.)
c. 1200, "the sin of buying or selling sacred things," from Old French simonie "selling of church offices" (12c.), from Late Latin simonia, from Simon Magus, the Samaritan magician who was rebuked by Peter when he tried to buy the power of conferring the Holy Spirit (Acts viii.18-20). Related: Simoniac; simoniacal.
Related entries & more 
mage (n.)

"magician, enchanter," c. 1400, Englished form of Latin magus "magician, learned magician," from Greek magos, a word used for the Persian learned and priestly class as portrayed in the Bible (said by ancient historians to have been originally the name of a Median tribe), from Old Persian magush "magician" (see magic and compare magi). An "archaic" word by late 19c. (OED), revived by fantasy games.

Related entries & more 
magi (n.)

c. 1200, "skilled magicians, astrologers," from Latin magi, plural of magus "magician, learned magician," from Greek magos, a word used for the Persian learned and priestly class as portrayed in the Bible (said by ancient historians to have been originally the name of a Median tribe), from Old Persian magush "magician" (see magic). Also, in Christian history, the "wise men" who, according to Matthew, came from the east to Jerusalem to do homage to the newborn Christ (late 14c.). Related: Magian.

Related entries & more 
Mac- 

common conjoined prefix in Scottish and Irish names, from Old Celtic *makko-s "son." Cognate *makwos "son" produced Old Welsh map, Welsh mab, ap "son;" also probably cognate with Old English mago "son, attendant, servant," Old Norse mögr "son," Gothic magus "boy, servant," Old English mægð "maid" (see maiden).

Formerly often abbreviated to M' and followed by a capital letter, or spelled out Mac and then rarely used with a capital; as, M'Donald, Macdoland, McDonald.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
conqueror (n.)

"one who wins a country, subjugates a people, or defeats an adversary," c. 1300, from Anglo-French conquerour, Old French conquereor, from Old French conquerre "conquer, defeat, vanquish," from Vulgar Latin *conquaerere (for Latin conquirere) "to search for, procure by effort, win," from assimilated form of Latin com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + quaerere "to seek, gain" (see query (v.)).

Another early form was conquestor, from the Latin agent noun, conquistor, conquaestor. Fem. form conqueress is attested from c. 1400. William Duke of Normandy was called William the Conqueror from early 12c. in Anglo-Latin (Guillelmus Magus id est conqustor rex Anglorum), by late 14c. in English.

Related entries & more