Etymology
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magnetic (adj.)

1610s, literal, "having the properties of a magnet;" 1630s, figurative, "having powers of attraction;" from Modern Latin magneticus, from Latin magnes (see magnet). Meaning "capable of being attracted by a magnet" is by 1837. Related: Magnetical (1580s); magnetics "the science of magnetism" (1786).

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ferromagnetic (adj.)
"behaving like iron in a magnetic field," 1840, from ferro- "iron" + magnetic.
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maglev 

system of rail transportation using two sets of magnets, 1973, a contraction of magnetic levitation.

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electromagnetic (adj.)

also electro-magnetic, "Pertaining to electromagnetics, or to the relation between electricity and magnetism; of the nature of electromagnetism," 1821; see electro- + magnetic.

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paramagnetic (adj.)

"assuming, when freely suspended between the poles of a horseshoe magnet, a position in a line from one pole to the other," 1850, from para- (1) + magnetic. Related: Paramagnetism.

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demagnetization (n.)

"act or process of depriving of magnetic polarity," 1844, noun of action from demagnetize.

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demagnetize (v.)

"deprive of magnetic polarity," 1835; see de- + magnetize. Related: Demagnetized; demagnetizing.

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magnetize (v.)

"charge or supply with magnetic properties," 1799, from magnet + -ize. Related: Magnetized; magnetizing. From 1785 in now-obsolete sense of "to mesmerize, hypnotize."

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magnetite (n.)

magnetic or magnetizable iron ore, 1840, from German magnetit; see magnet + -ite (2).

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magneto- 
word-forming element meaning "magnetic, magnetism," from Greek magneto-, combining form of magnes (see magnet).
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