Etymology
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cumulous (adj.)

in reference to clouds, "of the nature of cumulus clouds," 1815, see cumulo- + -ous.

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overcast (adj.)

c. 1300, of weather, "covered or overspread with clouds," past-participle adjective from verb overcast (early 13c.), "to place something over or across," also "to cover, to overspread" as with a garment, but usually of clouds, darkness (also "to knock down"), from over- + cast (v.).

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cloudless (adj.)

"without clouds, unobscured," 1590s, from cloud (n.) + -less. Related: Cloudlessly; cloudlessness.

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cloudy (adj.)

Old English cludig "rocky, hilly, full of cliffs;" see cloud (n.). Meaning "of the nature of atmospheric clouds" is recorded from c. 1300; meaning "full of clouds, overcast" is late 14c.; of liquids, etc., "not transparent, not clear," from 1580s. Figurative sense of "gloomy" is late 14c. Related: Cloudiness; cloudily.

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becloud (v.)
1590s, "cover with clouds," from be- + cloud. Figurative sense of "to obscure" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Beclouded; beclouding.
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mid-air (n.)

also midair, "the part of the air between the clouds and the air near the ground," from mid (adj.) + air (n.1).

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dust-storm (n.)

"windstorm which raises clouds of dust into the air in a desert," by 1838, from dust (n.) + storm (n.).

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cirrocumulus (n.)

also cirro-cumulus, type of cloud having the characteristics of both cirrus and cumulus clouds, 1803, from combining form of cirrus + cumulus.

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fleecy (adj.)
1560s, "wooly," from fleece (n.) + -y (2). From 1630s as "resembling fleece" in any sense (originally by Milton, of clouds).
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rainwater (n.)

"water that has fallen from the clouds as rain and has not sunk into the earth," Old English renwæter; see rain (n.) + water (n.1).

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