Etymology
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madrigal (n.)

"short love poem," especially one suitable for music, also "part-song for three or more voices," 1580s, from Italian madrigale, which is of uncertain origin; probably from Venetian dialect madregal "simple, ingenuous," from Late Latin matricalis "invented, original," literally "of or from the womb," from matrix (genitive matricis) "womb" (see matrix).

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canzone (n.)
1580s, a style of lyric poetry, from Italian canzone, from Latin cantionem (nominative cantio) "singing, song" (also source of Spanish cancion, French chanson), noun of action from past participle stem of canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). In Italian or Provençal, a song resembling the madrigal but less strict in style. In English as "a musical setting of such lyric poetry" (also canzona) by 1880.
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