Etymology
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macro (n.)
1959 in computing sense, shortened from macroinstruction.
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economics (n.)
1580s, "art of managing a household," perhaps from French économique (see economic); also see -ics. Meaning "science of wealth" is from 1792.
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macro- 

word-forming element meaning "long, abnormally large, on a large scale," taken into English via French and Medieval Latin from Greek makros "long, large," from PIE root *mak- "long, thin."

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macroeconomics (n.)

also macro-economics, "the science or study of the economy as a whole," by 1946, from macroeconomic; also see -ics.

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macroeconomic (adj.)

also macro-economic, "pertaining to the economy as a whole," 1938, from macro- + economic.

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microeconomics (n.)

also micro-economics, "the branch of economics concerned with single factors and individual decisions," 1948, from micro- + economics. Related: Microeconomic (adj.).

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macroinstruction (n.)

also macro-instruction, in computing, "a group of programming instructions compressed into a simpler form and appearing as a single instruction," 1959, from macro- + instruction.

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macroscopic (adj.)

"visible to the naked eye," 1841, from macro- + ending from microscopic. Related: Macroscopical; macroscopically.

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macrophotography (n.)

"photography of objects at or larger than actual size without the use of a magnifying lens," 1863, from macro- + photography.

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macrospore (n.)

in botany, "a spore of large size compared with others," 1859, from macro- "large" + spore (n.).

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